Fotoeins Fotografie

location bifurcation, place & home

Posts tagged ‘British Columbia’

My Fuji X70 recipes: Fujichrome Slide & Kodak Platinum 200

Above/featured: 1st Narrows, from John Lawson Pier.

My Fujifilm X70 mirrorless fixed-lens prime camera has been a big plus for photography at domestic and international locations. The built-into-camera film-simulations (e.g., Provia, Velvia) work beautifully in standard settings, but as I’ve never had a film camera, the advent of “camera recipes” to produce additional film-like settings stimulated interest in different colour or pictorial representations.

So far, I’ve tested these Fujifilm film-simulation (“film-sim”) recipes:

•   Ektachrome 100SW (saturated warm), simulating images with the Kodak colour transparency or slide films produced 1996–2002;
•   Kodachrome 64, simulating images with the Kodak colour film produced between the mid-1970s and 2009;
•   Kodacolor, “producing classic Kodak analog aesthetic closest to early-1980s Kodacolor VR200 colour film that’s been overexposed.”


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BVG, U2, Zoologischer Garten, U-Bahn, Berlin, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

21 for 21: Foto(ein)s for 2021

Above/featured: U2 train departing Berlin’s Zoologischer Garten station – 28 November 2021.

I look back at an eventful 2021 year with 21 images with personal questions about how impending- and actual-loss affect how life proceeds beyond death, and how feelings of real belonging are different from feelings of a proper home.


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My Fuji X70: Kodacolor film-sim recipe

Above/featured: After Girard: Vancouver-Strathcona, 14 Oct 2021.

The Fujifilm X70 mirrorless fixed-lens prime camera has been a real boon to my approach to photography for personal projects both domestically and internationally. To satisfy my curiosity, I’ve provided examples of X70 images made with two Fujifilm analog-film simulation (film-sim) recipes:

•   Ektachrome 100SW (saturated warm), simulating images with the Kodak colour transparency or slide films produced between 1996 to 2002;
•   Kodachrome 64, simulating images with the Kodak colour film produced between the mid-1970s and 2009.

In this post, I examine the Kodacolor film-simulation, a reproduction of which Fuji X Weekly’s Ritchie Roesch describes as “producing a classic Kodak analog aesthetic.” According to Roesch, the digital film-simulation is closest to Kodacolor VR analog color film from the early-1980s, whose ISO200 version is still available for purchase as “ColorPlus 200” (Kodacolor 200).

The following film-simulation recipe creates images similar to the look of “Kodacolor VR 200 (film) that’s been overexposed.” My X70 settings are:

  • ‘Classic Chrome’ built-in film-sim
  • Dynamic Range: DR400
  • Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Color: -2 (Low)
  • Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
  • Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
  • White Balance: 6300K; -3 Red, -2 Blue
  • ISO: Auto, up to 6400 for “grainy” appearance (or fixed to 1000)

The recipe above is for the X-Trans II sensor; the corresponding recipe for an updated or more recent sensor is found here. All other recipes sorted by specific sensor are found here.

The following images were made at locations throughout metropolitan Vancouver. Minor adjustments to brightness level, rotation, and geometric distortion have been applied from straight-out-of-the-camera (SOOC) to posting.


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Maplewood Flats, Burrard Inlet, Burnaby Mountain, North Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, five

Civilization, before colonization

In the District of North Vancouver, Maplewood Flats is a wildlife conservation area including lush green space and a set of mudflats (off-limits to humans). In this image facing east are the following place names, courtesy of the SFU Bill Reid Centre:

•   Stitsma – fishing spot for the Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish) people, an area once abundant in salmon, trout, and crab.

•   Lhuḵw’lhuḵw’áyten – Squamish for “arbutus from which bark is removed in spring”; Barnet Marine Park, formerly Barnet Mill. Now includes all of Burnaby Mountain and Simon Fraser University (SFU).

•   səl̓ilw̓ət – hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ word meaning “waters of Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm”; root word for səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ – “Tsleil-Waututh” place/residence/village in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language, meaning “People of the Inlet.” Land remnant today is Burrard Inlet Reserve No. 3.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 16 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfy.

Port of Vancouver, CenTerm, former Hastings Mill, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, four

Civilization, before colonization

•   q̓əmq̓ə́mələɬp in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

The meaning of the words is roughly “leafy maple trees”.

The headquarters for the Canadian Fishing Company (Canfisco) and the massive cranes of the Port of Vancouver’s CenTerm shipping facility provide this present-day picture at the foot of Gore and Dunlevy Streets. Recent history has this location as the home of Stamps Mill (1865, later Hastings Mill). Lining the image at right are the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway, connecting the Colony of British Columbia with national confederation and accelerating settler expansion from east to west.

The Sea-to-Sky highway between Vancouver and Pemberton has highway signs with locations printed in English and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh. Vancouver is listed as “Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓” on signs along route BC-99, even though the physical area defined by the modern city once had multiple indigenous names for settlements and landmarks before colonization.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 2 Jul 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfs.

Coast Salish place names, Coast Salish, Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Vancouver Art Gallery North Plaza, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, three

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the north plaza at the Vancouver Art Gallery:

•   šxʷƛ̓ənəq in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Xwtl’e7énḵ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

Both words mean “a place for (cultural) gathering or ceremony.”

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 29 May 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/13, ISO800, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf4.

Coast Salish place names, Coast Salish, Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Queen Elizabeth Theatre Plaza, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, two

Civilization, before colonization

On 18 June 2018, the City of Vancouver changed the name of the front or north plaza at Queen Elizabeth Theatre:

•   šxʷƛ̓exən in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people, meaning “place where people are invited”.
•   Xwtl’a7shn in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people, meaning “place where people are invited to celebrate”.

The correct pronunciation for these names can be found on YouTube.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 8 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/14, ISO1250, and 18.5mm, 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lf0.

Coast Salish place names, Coast Salish, Musqueam, Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Stanley Park, Burrard Inlet, Lions Gate Bridge, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, one

Civilization, before colonization

Over what is presently called First Narrows is this view southeast towards the green peninsula called Stanley Park, adjacent to Vancouver’s West End and the city centre. On display are various locations in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh languages for the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples. The waters of Burrard Inlet are known as səl̓ilw̓ət (“inlet”), from which Tsleil-Waututh is derived and whose name means “People of the inlet.”

I assembled place-names from Musqueam Place Names Map and Squamish Atlas; and from printed sources by Carson et al., Macdonald, Matthews, Suttles, and Waite.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 10 July 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/10, ISO1000, 14mm (21mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-leR.

My Fuji X70: Ektachrome 100SW film-sim recipe

Above/featured:False Creek east, from Cambie Bridge – 12 Jul 2021.

A variety of film simulations in the form of recipes with different settings are applicable to Fujifilm cameras to create uniquely historical and/or vintage look to images. Fortunately, a number of recipes are available to apply onto Fuji cameras with X-Trans II sensors.

That’s where my Fuji X70 has entered the fun fray. Previously, I showed examples of images made with the Kodachrome 64 recipe, simulating images made with the Kodak analog colour film produced from the mid-1970s to its final run in 2009.

I wanted to try another film-simulation recipe: the Ektachrome 100SW (SW for ‘saturated warm’) described by Ritchie Roesch in Fuji X Weekly. Historically, the Kodak company produced the ‘Ektachrome’ line of colour transparency or slide films. From its introduction in 1996 to its termination in 2002, the ‘Ektachrome 100SW’ film with increased ISO sensitivity produced images with deeper colours and warmer colour balance.

At locations throughout metropolitan Vancouver over a period of four weeks in July and August 2021, here are images below straight-out-of-the-camera (SOOC) with the following settings:

  • ‘Velvia’ built-in film-sim
  • Dynamic Range: DR200
  • Highlight: +2 (High)
  • Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
  • Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
  • Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
  • White Balance: Auto; +1 Red, -2 Blue
  • ISO: Auto up to 3200 (or fixed to 1000)

All recipes sorted by specific sensor are found here.


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Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Salish Girl,” by Susan Point

On the Point Grey campus of the University of British Columbia stands the Reconciliation Pole, carved by Haida hereditary chief and master carver 7idansuu (Edenshaw), known also by James Hart. The pole was raised on 1 April 2017 in a grand ceremony.

Above the “residential school” are several standing figures holding each other’s hands; a young girl with a bright red tunic was carved by Susan Point. Their feet aren’t shown, representing the lack of grounding and abundance of abuse. A blight on the nation’s history, the Canadian government stole an estimated 150-thousand indigenous children from their families, forcing them into residential schools across the country. Countless people, family generations, and once intact regional cultures were systematically destroyed, amounting to a state-sanctioned program of cultural genocide.

The Reconciliation People is a small step in not only an admission of guilt, but a part of the forward-moving process of remembrance by Canadians and reconciliation between First Nations and the national government.

Susan Point, Salish Girl, Reconciliation Pole, James Hart, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

I made the photo above on 22 Aug 2019 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime with settings 1/280-sec, f/16, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kBS.

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