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Posts tagged ‘Baden-Wuerttemberg’

Petrikirche, Taufkirche, Eisleben, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Tracing Luther’s steps in 16 German cities (Reformation 500)

FEATURED: “Luther war hier. // Luther was here.” Eisleben, Germany (HL, 27 Oct 2016).

In pre-teen years, I attended a Catholic elementary school by weekday, and a missions-oriented Protestant church by weekend. I already had multiple questions running around my pre-scientist brain, like electrons appearing and dissipating in a fuzzy halo. When various disparate elements began to settle with few satisfying answers, I left behind the churches and their respective religions. But one thing that’s remained is my love of history. History has never been boring, because I carry the past (as offspring of immigrants), and I’m determined to bring history’s lessons into the present.

Even in youth, I had to ask: why was one set of churches called “Protestant”? What was under protest? How did one man help spark a movement that would help merge and create a version of a language that continues today, that would bring accessible means to literacy for the public, and that would begin to change rule by religion to rule by law?

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Fächerstadt Karlsruhe: fan-shaped city in Baden-Württemberg

You won’t likely find another German city in the shape of a fan.

Sitting pretty near the Rhine river in southwest Germany, Karlsruhe is known as the “Fächerstadt” (“fan city”) for its very specific shape.

On 17 June 1715, Margrave1 Karl Wilhelm (Charles William) of Baden-Durlach celebrated breaking ground and the first laid stone for his new residence, palace, and seat of power. The story goes that after a vivid dream, Karl Wilhelm decided to build his new home of “rest and relaxation” (“Karls Ruhe”) in the middle of a nearby forest. A planned city would surround the palace, an appropriate symbol for the question of “who ruled whom.” The palace sat at the central hub of 32 “rays” or streets radiating outwards: 9 streets to make up the new city, and 23 for the palace gardens. Emerging from the palace was the “Via Triumphalis,” the north-south central axis road into the city. Karl Wilhelm moved the margraviate seat from nearby Durlach to the “new shiny city” of Karlsruhe upon completion of the new palace in 1718.

In the spring of 1788, Thomas Jefferson, while serving as America’s chief of mission (Minister Plenipotentiary) in France, embarked on a tour of Holland and the Rhine river in what is now Germany. He stayed in “Carlsruh”2 on 15 and 16 April 1788. Impressed by what he saw throughout his trip, he sent a letter and sketches3 to Pierre Charles L’Enfant4 who was charged by George Washington with the design and construction of a new American capital city. Jefferson wrote to L’Enfant on 10 April 1791:

“…in compliance with your request I have examined my papers and found the plans of Frankfort on the Mayne, Carlsruhe, Amsterdam Strasburg, Paris, Orleans, Bordeaux, Lyons, Montpelier, Marseilles, Turin and Milan, which I send in a roll by this post. They are on large and accurate scales, having been procured by me while in those respective cities myself. …”

With copies of European city plans in hand, these plans provided inspiration for L’Enfant’s eventual design for Washington, DC.

The Badisches Landesmuseum has occupied the palace since 1921, and the city of Karlsruhe celebrated its 300th anniversary5 in 2015.


What would Thomas Jefferson have seen?

Dated between 1739 and 1779, the following four maps from Stadt Karlsruhe city archives would have been representative of the young city at the time of Thomas Jefferson’s 1788 visit.

Historische Stadtpläne, Bilderbogen, Stadt Karlsruhe

1739 city view with south at top; coloured copper engraving by Christian Thran.

Historische Stadtpläne, Bilderbogen, Stadt Karlsruhe

1739 city view with north at top; the “fan” consists of 9 streets; coloured copper engraving by Christian Thran.

Historische Stadtpläne, Bilderbogen, Stadt Karlsruhe

Map dated 1745 of “Carlsruhe” (Karlsruhe), Durlach, and surroundings, with west at top, towards the Rhine river (Rhein Fl.).

Historische Stadtpläne, Bilderbogen, Stadt Karlsruhe

1779 city map: north at top, Schloss (palace) at circle’s centre. Note how palace “wings” extend south into a “fan” of 9 streets into the young city.


Panorama from the Schlossturm (Palace Tower)

Even in the dreary days of late-fall and early-winter, there are sweeping views of the city and surrounding area from the top of the tower; even the tower’s stairs are themselves a highlight of geometry. It’s also important to realize 14 kilometres to the German-French border isn’t far at all.

Schloss Karlsruhe, Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Up the palace tower (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

South view, along Via Triumphalis through Schlossplatz (palace square). The hills in the background are about 10 kilometres distant (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Wide south view with the Via Triumphalis north-south axis at centre. Note palace “wings” at far-left and -right, making the “fan” into the city (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Southwest, to Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal Constitutional Court) at centre-right, just beyond the palace (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Northwest, towards Majolika Manufaktur Karlsruhe at upper right (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

North-northeast to Schlossgartensee (palace garden lake) at centre-left and Wildparkstadion (stadium) at right (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Northeast: Wildstadion at left, Grossherzogliche Grabkapelle at centre in the distance (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Facing east; Grossherzogliche Grabkapelle at far left in the distance, Kirche St. Bernhard at right to the southeast (HL).

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Facing southeast; Kirche St. Bernhard at left, and beyond Schlossplatz at centre is Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) Campus Süd (HL)

City view, Schlossturm, Schloss Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Return to the south-facing view of Schlossplatz, or palace square (HL).

Schloss Karlsruhe, Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Down the palace tower (HL).


cmply/2 promo disclosure-badge verticalThanks to Karlsruhe Tourismus and Hotel Rio Karlsruhe for a warm welcome and access to venues and services. Old city maps are from Stadt Karlsruhe’s archives. I made the remaining photographs on 17 November 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8Cv.

Notes

1 A “margrave” was a hereditary title for a prince in the Holy Roman Empire; their territory was called a “margraviate” (Markgrafschaft). Margraviate Baden-Durlach and neighbouring Margraviate Baden-Baden reunited in 1771 to form the Margraviate of Baden. After dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the Grand Duchy of Baden was created as a member state within Napoleon’s Confederation of the Rhine.

2 “Notes of a Tour through Holland and the Rhine Valley, 3 March–23 April 1788,” Founders Online, National Archives, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-13-02-0003. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 13, March–7 October 1788, ed. Julian P. Boyd. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1956, pp. 8–36.]

3 “XII. Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Charles L’Enfant, 10 April 1791,” Founders Online, National Archives, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-20-02-0001-0015. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 20, 1 April–4 August 1791, ed. Julian P. Boyd. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982, pp. 86–87.]

4 More about Pierre Charles L’Enfant appears at the US Library of Congress.

5 Wulf Rüskamp wrote this article for the Badische Zeitung (in German).

Globale, ZKM Globale, Global Control and Censorship, Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie, ZKM, Centre for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

ZKM Karlsruhe: GLOBALE, Drawings by Dan Perjovschi

What is the cost of being online? What is the price an individual is willing to relinquish to be “public”? What is the public-private threshold beyond which neither individual or society finds acceptable? Is it 0.01% (1-in-10000)? 0.1% (1-in-1000)? Is there in fact any threshold for unmonitored unchecked blanket measures of security?

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Love locks, Alte Bruecke, Old Bridge, Heidelberg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: love locks on Heidelberg’s Old Bridge

There’s a well-used saying: “home is where the heart is.” Judging by what appears above, perhaps the saying should be modified to “the heart is where my home is.”

I’ve returned briefly to my former hometown of Heidelberg in time for the opening of the Christmas markets. I’m encountering a bright fall day and the sun shines brightly on the Alte Brücke (Old Bridge), the Neckar river, and the mottled colours of fall’s leaves on the flanking hills. Some have begun attaching love locks on various places along the bridge. Regardless of opinion for or against, these locks provide splashes of colour in near-focus, contrasting with blur of colours in the background.

I made the photo above on 25 November 2014 with the Canon 6D camera, EF 24-105 zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/2000s, f/4, ISO400, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com at http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6vx. Access to public transport was kindly provided by Heidelberg Marketing and the RNV (Rhein-Neckar-Verkehr) regional transport authority.

Cafe Burkardt, Heidelberger Altstadt, Germany, fotoeins.com

My Heidelberg: Cafe Burkardt in the Old Town

I’m often “home” in Heidelberg to visit friends who are in the city to work for the university or one of the many institutes in town. An important component for any visit to Heidelberg is Untere Strasse in the Altstadt (Lower Street in the Old Town). The narrow cobblestone street includes cafes, pubs, and shops with a neighbourhood feel attracting not only university students for “pub crawls” but also city residents for their favourite hangout spots.

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