Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of home & place

Posts from the ‘Autumn’ category

Seattle Sunday at Ballard Farmers Market

In Seattle, a friend in Ballard recommends a visit to their neighbourhood’s weekly farmers’ market. Despite the forecast for intermittent morning showers, I’m lured by any stroll through a market for bright harvest colours and freshly prepared food.

A slow meander through the stalls, letting curiosity be the guide. Fresh apples and pears here; ripe plump tomatoes there. From an assortment of red and yellow peppers; to an array of yellow and green gourds. Quickly, the appetite is on high alert. Quesadillas prepared fresh from the grill. Hot from the fryer, little donuts sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. Happy dogs walking their humans; couples strolling with children; others sitting on the curb for a chat, nosh, and sip.


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My Seattle: Bruce & Brandon Lee, father & son

Honouring the surname

In the mid- to late-1970s, our parents took us to single-screen movie theatres with names like Olympia, Golden Harvest, and Shaw for cinema night to watch movies made in Hong Kong. There were dramas; some high on the melodrama and low on character. Some were historic-period pieces, and there were kung-fu movies for which Dad passed his love to me.

There’s nothing quite like seeing a kung-fu action sequence on a big screen. I was mesmerized the first time I laid eyes on a memorable fight scene set in Rome’s Colosseum, that epic scene observed by little stone dragons between “Little Dragon” himself, Bruce Lee, and Chuck Norris’ character in the 1972 film “The Way of the Dragon“. As a kid, I was proud to have had the same surname as this Bruce fellow, and memories of seeing his on-screen characters prevailing in fights have stuck over time (e.g., “Boards don’t hit back.”)

Tragically, Bruce and his son, Brandon, died too young. I’m certain when I was a teen that I asked where Bruce Lee was buried; my parents didn’t know and in pre-internet days, it was more of a challenge to find those answers. But the mystery has long been solved: Bruce Lee and his son, Brandon, lay side by side in Lake View Cemetery in Seattle’s Capitol Hill.

Despite multiple visits to the city in years past, this particular return trip to Seattle has been decades in the making for a chance to honour a part of my childhood and a part of my heritage. When I find the Lees, my arrival means another answer has been quietly realized. On a crisp bright autumn morning under blue skies, I feel my father’s spirit with me; he never had the chance to come to this cemetery. My lips move without voice, a prayer I utter into the ether, pushing for hope to reach him. Because I know now that this, is also for my Dad.


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1-day drive in the US Southwest: Tucson to Santa Fe

Above/featured: Northeast on US-60/AZ-77, through the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, just outside of Show Low, AZ.

The following takes place entirely on the 15th and final day of our drive through the American Southwest. Departing Tucson, Arizona, we headed north and east on AZ-77, US-60, and I-25 into New Mexico for our destination in Santa Fe, New Mexico. We drove through a variety of landscapes in east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico for a total of 856 kilometres (532 miles).


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El Rancho Hotel, Gallup, New Mexico, US 66, US route 66, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Hotel El Rancho

(October 2018.)

On our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff, we stopped in Gallup, New Mexico for a few hours. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup was once a busy railway depot town big on coal, but now is a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

Hotel El Rancho exudes what we would call “an old-school charm with the nostalgia of driving culture.” (And for effect, we roll the r’s in Rrrrrrrancho.) Gallup lay along former highway US-66, which explains why the hotel was built in 1938 directly in front of the highway’s route through town. It’s one beaut of a throwback.

I made the two pictures on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-iA2.

El Rancho Hotel, Gallup, New Mexico, US 66, US route 66, USA, fotoeins.com

Main hotel lobby.

History of the Gallup Region, Lloyd Moylan, Federal Art Project, New Deal, McKinley County Courthouse, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Moylan’s “New Deal” mural

(October 2018.)

On our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff, we stopped in Gallup, New Mexico for a few hours. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup was once a busy railway depot town big on coal, but now is a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

Next to the new county courthouse is the old county courthouse built in 1938. Itself a part of the New Deal Federal Arts Project (1935-1943), the old courthouse building housed a variety of other New Deal art works, including 10-foot murals by Lloyd Moylan up on the inside walls of the historic courtroom. Moylan’s murals “Allegory – History of the Region” show how people’s lives have changed through history of the area.

I made the picture above on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/125-sec, f/4, ISO4000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-izX.

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