Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts from the ‘Seasons’ category

My Fuji X70: Kodachrome64 film-simulation

Above/featured: South portal, Lions Gate Bridge – 25 Jun 2021.

I wrote about how the Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime has been great for my photography. Fujifim prides itself on good to faithful reproductions of film simulations (film-sims). For the most part, I’ve used the default or “Standard” setting, equivalent to the “Provia” film-sim which is one of 11 film-sims built into the X70.

I learned about other film-sims, particularly those applicable to the older X-Trans II sensor that’s in my X70 camera. I’ve been interested in digital reproductions of “old” colour slide film, and seeing how images over a variety of subject matter appear with a film-sim that looks a little more like “old school film”. Ritchie Roesch describes in Fuji X Weekly the differences between the Kodachrome II and Kodachrome 64 film-sims; the former resembling the look of Kodak film from the 1960s to the mid-1970s and the latter echoing the final version of the film-type from the mid-1970s to 2009.

At locations throughout metropolitan Vancouver, I’ve made the images below using the “Kodachrome 64” film-sim with this recipe to apply the following settings:

  • ‘Classic Chrome’ built-in film-sim
  • Dynamic Range: DR400
  • Highlight: +2 (High)
  • Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Color: 0 (Medium)
  • Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
  • Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
  • White Balance: Daylight; 0 Red, -3 Blue
  • ISO: Auto up to 3200 (or fixed to 1000)

( Click here for images )

Friedensengel, Friedensdenkmal, Maximiliansanlage, Bogenhausen, Muenchen, Munich, Bayern, Bavaria, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday around Munich: tall gold Nike in peace

Standing high in Maximiliansanlage (Maximilian Park) is a peace monument 38-metres (125-feet) tall constructed by Heinrich Düll, Georg Pezold, and Max Heilmaier. The Friedensengel (angel of peace) with the Greek goddess of victory, Nike, was completed and raised in 1899 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the end of the Franco-Prussian War.

The monument and column sit at the top of a square temple with the Prinzregent-Luitpold-Terrasse observation platform where visitors can see west down Prinzregentenstrasse. In her right hand, Nike holds an olive branch in peace; in her left hand she holds a small figure of the goddess Athena to represent both war and wisdom.

I made this photo on 23 Feb 2017 with the Canon EOS6D mark1, 70-300 glass, and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 220mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kpQ.

Deutsches Museum, Muenchen, Munich, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Deutschland, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday around Munich: Deutsches Museum

You cannot possibly take in every exhibit inside the massive Deutsches Museum (German Museum) in a single afternoon or even an entire day. At some point, the mind short circuits, feet will ache, and the stomach sends urgent “I am hungy” messages to the brain. But for a physicist and scientist by training, this museum is a real joy.

With the temporary exhibition “Auf zu neuen Energien” (Onto new forms of energy), I learn about “green power” in Germany, about where in the country solar and wind power is best “collected” or generated. Figuring that out depends on lots of specific meteorological data. The two figures/plots show average annual solar incident radiation at the surface and average annual wind speed at an elevation of 80 metres (typical height of a wind turbine). The sunniest areas indicated with red above are in the southern quarter of the country, and the windiest regions indicated with red below are by the open seas in the north and up in highlands and mountains.

Deutsches Museum, Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD, annual solar incidence, Muenchen, Munich, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Deutschland, Germany, fotoeins.com

Average annual solar incidence, in kilowatt-hours per square metre (1 kWh/m^2 = 3600 kJ/m^2). Courtesy of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (German Meteorological Service), this plot shows how the country’s southern quarter receives the most sun.

Deutsches Museum, Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD, annual average wind speed, Muenchen, Munich, Bayern, Bavaria, Oberbayern, Upper Bavaria, Deutschland, Germany, fotoeins.com

Average annual wind speed at an elevation of 80 metres, the typical height of a wind turbine. Wind speeds are shown between 3 to 10 metres per second (11 to 36 kilometres per hour). The reddest areas in the northern lowlands by the sea and in highlands and mountains have highest average wind speeds above 7 m/s (25 km/h). Image/plot from Deutscher Wetterdienst (German Meteorological Service).

I made all three photos above on 23 Feb 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kpM.

Maibaum, Kirche St. Johann Baptist, Wiener Platz, Au-Haidhausen, Muenchen, Munich, Bayern, Bavaria, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday around Munich: Maibaum am Wiener Platz

Above/featured: Maypole at Wiener Platz, facing west to the church of St. John the Baptist.

If I hadn’t already identified the location as somewhere inside Munich, one would think this was the main square in a small Bavarian town. The square here was named “Wiener Platz” (Vienna Square) in 1891 next to an access route joining with the main road leading east-southwest out of Munich in the direction of Vienna. The farmers’ market here in the square opened for the first time in November 1901. After destruction from bombing in World War Two, survivors rebuilt the square in the post-war years. Dressed in the distinctive Bavarian colours of blue and white, the Maibaum (May pole) was raised in the centre of the square in May 2013; the original tree was felled a few months earlier in the forest near Arget (Sauerlach) south of Munich.

I made this photo on 23 Feb 2017 with the Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/11, ISO500, and 28mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kpI.

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Vancouver: Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School

In late-May 2021, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announced the discovery of 215 children buried in a mass grave at a former residential school near Kamloops, British Columbia; ground-penetrating radar was used to locate the remains.

During a period of 160 years, the Government of Canada in concert with churches constructed residential schools in a state-sponsored process of “aggressive assimilation” to make children of Indigenous people “less aboriginal and more white” with instruction in English and Christianity in order to erase the children’s traditions and cultural ties.

More than 150-thousand children were sent to some 130 residential schools across Canada between 1830s and the 1990s. Forcibly removed from their homes and parents, children of Indigenous peoples were forced into the schools where they faced neglect and physical and sexual abuse. Physical records indicate a total of over 4000 children deaths; the actual number is very likely much higher. Many children were not buried properly, parents were not notified about what happened to their children: many children who were forced into residential schools never returned home. For years, survivors have told their stories about what happened inside those schools: there is every expectation more mass graves and more children will be found.

The systematic removal of indigenous children from their families disrupted, divided, and destroyed living generations of indigenous families, robbing people of their respective culture and language and the wealth of lived experiences shared between generations. According to the terms and definitions laid out in the 1948 United Nations’ Convention, Canada committed genocide against their Indigenous Peoples. The destructive effects of white colonialism upon Indigenous Peoples in the country is not only historical but continues today with inequity, intransigence, obstruction and obfuscation, and injustice.

A makeshift memorial was quickly created at the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery at Robson Square. It’s worth noting the Art Gallery is presently housed in the former provincial court house which opened in 1911 and would have served as a “legal” instrument of white- and settler-colonialism. That this National Historic Site is the location of an improvised tribute to the loss of life and dignity caused by state-sponsored acts of genocide is an enormous juxtaposition.

June is National Indigenous History Month in Canada.


Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com
Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

“Are we human?”

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com
Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

“Bring our children home.”

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

As a resident of Vancouver, I’m a guest on unceded traditional territory and land of the Coast Salish First Nations: Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh), and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). I made all images above on 1 June 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-l2C.

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