Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts from the ‘Seasons’ category

My Vienna: Habsburg favourite Tafelspitz, at Plachutta Hietzing

What appears to be a plate of slow simmered beef is anything but “simple”.

Tafelspitz is a dish with a lot going on,” said Austrian chef Kurt Gutenbrunner to the New York Times in 2002. “It’s hot, cold, spicy, creamy, crunchy and soft.”

Eaten daily by Habsburg Emperor Franz Joseph I (1830-1916), the dish is well-known among Vienna favourites. Among members of the Jewish community of the time, the Tafelspitz was a beloved symbol of assimilation in late 19th-century/early 20th-century Vienna.

Reading about the description for Tafelspitz brings about a sharp childhood memory of a soup made by Mum. Tender chunks of chuck roast, accompanied by carrots, potatoes, celery, shards of ginger root, and often with apple to provide extra sweet; cooked slow and simmering in a huge pot on the stovetop for hours. The resulting soup was a meal on its own, or served as a final course at dinner.

Plachutta is well-known among the Viennese for making some of the best Tafelspitz in the city. A big Plachutta is located centrally in the inner city, but I head west to the city’s 13th district for their original Stammhaus location in Hietzing. It’s fitting somehow that the Hietzing location is close to the Habsburg summer palace at Schönbrunn.

The images show a wonderful spread with the Tafelspitz dish with my choice of the Tafelspitz or rump steak cut. I started with the long slow simmered soup broth, ladled out into a bowl with big chunks of egg frittata. And provided within a bowl of soup are the specific details of family: nourishing, caring, satisfying.

After a section of slow-cooked bone is presented, I spread the soft gelatinous marrow onto slices of toasted dark bread, topped with salt and pepper. Next, slices of moist tender slow-cooked beef are laid onto a plate, along with crunchy fried potatoes, creamed spinach, apple-horseradish sauce, and chive sauce.

Certainly, I paid a little more for the meal, but the Plachutta Tafelspitz was a great dining experience, providing a new memory of Viennese cuisine, combined with a family memory of Cantonese-style home-cooked food.


Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Plachutta Stammhaus Hietzing is at Auhofstrasse 1, about 5 minutes on foot from Schönbrunner Schlosspark’s northwest gate, Hietzinger Tor.

Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Restaurant seating.

Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

My table near the front door.

Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Tafelspitz dish, the complete spread. The soup and marrow are starters; the “main event” is still in the big soup pot.

Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Beef marrow, scooped and spread on toasted dark bread, and topped with salt and pepper.

Tafelspitz, Plachutta Hietzing, Plachutta, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Tafelspitz dish, with the Tafelspitz cut. “It’s hot, cold, spicy, creamy, crunchy and soft.”

Plachutta, Rindfleisch, Rindfleischschnitte, Plachutta Stammhaus Hietzing, 13. Bezirk, Hietzing, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Rindfleischschnitte / beef cuts. The Tafelspitz cut is also known as the “rump (roast).”


Directions

•   Public transport with Wiener Linien: U4 to station Hietzing; then 0.5 km walk, or tram 10 or 60 to stop Dommayergasse.

My visit to Plachutta Stammhaus Hietzing was neither requested nor sponsored. I made all photos above on 3 Jun 2022 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mSS.

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, forty

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

30 September 2012.

Near Farm Cove in Sydney, Australia, flower bed number 150 on the grounds of the Royal Botanic Garden contains these red canna lilies. The bright new springtime bloom appears in front of the famous Opera House and the Harbour Bridge (known also as the “Coathanger”).

I made the image on 30 Sep 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/1600-sec, f/5, ISO200, 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mwC.

My Fuji X70: testing Fujichrome Slide & Kodak Platinum 200 on sunny summer day

Above/featured: 1st Narrows, from John Lawson Pier.

My Fujifilm X70 mirrorless fixed-lens prime camera has been a big plus for photography at domestic and international locations. The built-into-camera film-simulations (e.g., Provia, Velvia) work beautifully in standard settings, but as I’ve never had a film camera, the advent of “camera recipes” to produce additional film-like settings stimulated interest in different colour or pictorial representations.

So far, I’ve tested these Fujifilm film-simulation (“film-sim”) recipes:

•   Ektachrome 100SW (saturated warm), simulating images with the Kodak colour transparency or slide films produced 1996–2002;
•   Kodachrome 64, simulating images with the Kodak colour film produced between the mid-1970s and 2009;
•   Kodacolor, “producing classic Kodak analog aesthetic closest to early-1980s Kodacolor VR200 colour film that’s been overexposed.”


( Click here for images )

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirty-nine

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

17 September 2012.

From the top of the Roundhouse (1831), this northeast view along High Street faces turn-of-the-century architecture prevalent throughout Australia around the time of the gold rush. Hotel Fremantle (1899) is at left-centre, whereas the former home of the Fremantle Municipal Tramways (Car Barn, 1905) is at the very right. The city of Fremantle is located about 20 km southwest from Perth in Western Australia.

I made the image on 17 Sep 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/500-sec, f/8, ISO200, 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-mwA.

My Vienna: an outsider’s view, from 1 to 23

Above/featured: Aspern lake at the Aspern Seestadt housing development in Vienna’s 22nd district. Visible in the background to the north are the Danube tower and the city’s hills. Photo, 7 Jun 2022.

From early-2002 to mid-2003, I lived and worked in Heidelberg, and I travelled to Vienna at least six times across all seasons for collaboration work between MPIA and the University of Vienna. Unfortunately, I didn’t own a camera, and I have zero images from that time. “Oiiida.”

After a 15-year pause, I returned to Vienna for one week in May 2018 for the 100-year anniversary of Vienna Modernism. I brought 2 cameras, and I made a few photographs here and there. I’ve always needed more, and four years later in May 2022, I stayed in Vienna for four weeks.

The historic bread- and pastry-making company, Anker, once had a motto known among the Viennese:

Worauf freut sich der Wiener, wenn er vom Urlaub kommt? Auf Hochquellwasser und Ankerbrot.
To what do the Viennese look forward after returning from vacation? Spring water and Ankerbrot.

For all of us who’re visitors to Vienna, I put forward the modified question:

Worauf freut sich ein(e) Besucher(in), wenn man nach Wien kommt?
To what does a visitor look forward in Vienna?

There are many answers for many people. There’s art, coffee, Jugendstil, music, wine; these are only five in a lengthy list. Vienna is more than a desirable visitor location; the city reclaimed the top spot in the The Economist’s EIU Global Liveability Index for 2022.

I got to explore at least one point of interest in each of the city’s 23 Bezirke or districts. Not only did I spend a lot of time in the inner city or 1st district, but I also made my fair share in the 6th, 9th, 18th, and 19th districts. Below I provide from each of the city’s 23 districts a couple of personal highlights which may be of interest to both resident and visitor. There are more interesting locations, about which I’ll describe separately in future posts.


( Click here for images and more )

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