Fotoeins Fotografie

revisioning place and home

Posts from the ‘Canada’ category

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, fourteen

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

9 April 2012.

Once, when a wae lad was I, I was a big fan of ice hockey. I used to think being a fan of hockey was synonymous with being Canadian; in time, I was quickly disabused of this naivety with many spotlights illuminating the long thread of racism. Generally, it’s very difficult to follow sports news in this country that avoids hockey news and updates. With unease in place, my return to a city where I lived for seven years included a return to the “Cathedral of Hockey”.

At the corner of Yonge and Front in downtown Toronto is a building formerly used by the Bank of Montreal. The building has found very good use as home to the Hockey Hall of Fame, which does a great job telling stories of small-town origins and what the sport means to people across the country. It’s also a good if slow start to see increasing exposure on black players, Asian players, and the origins and rise of women’s hockey. Under low lighting, a sudden hush floats upon guests inside the Great Hall. The space is filled with trophies and plaques dedicated to its best players. At one end of the space is what many consider the Holy Grail: professional ice hockey’s ultimate trophy, known as the Stanley Cup.

I made the image above on 9 Apr 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/60-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, 24mm focal length (38mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to the E. family for making my return visit to Toronto possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lKz.

21 for 21: Foto(ein)s for 2021

Above/featured: U2 train departing Berlin’s Zoologischer Garten station – 28 November 2021.

I look back at an eventful 2021 year with 21 images with personal questions about how impending- and actual-loss affect how life proceeds beyond death, and how feelings of real belonging are different from feelings of a proper home.


( Click here for images and more )

My Fuji X70: Kodacolor film-simulation

Above/featured: After Girard: Vancouver-Strathcona, 14 Oct 2021.

The Fujifilm X70 mirrorless fixed-lens prime camera has been a real boon to my approach to photography for personal projects both domestically and internationally. To satisfy my curiosity, I’ve provided examples of X70 images made with two Fujifilm analog-film simulation (film-sim) recipes:

•   Ektachrome 100SW (saturated warm), simulating images with the Kodak colour transparency or slide films produced between 1996 to 2002;
•   Kodachrome 64, simulating images with the Kodak colour film produced between the mid-1970s and 2009.

In this post, I examine the Kodacolor film-simulation, a reproduction of which Fuji X Weekly’s Ritchie Roesch describes as “producing a classic Kodak analog aesthetic.” According to Roesch, the digital film-simulation is closest to Kodacolor VR analog color film from the early-1980s, whose ISO200 version is still available for purchase as “ColorPlus 200” (Kodacolor 200).

The following film-simulation recipe creates images similar to the look of “Kodacolor VR 200 (film) that’s been overexposed.” My X70 settings are:

  • ‘Classic Chrome’ built-in film-sim
  • Dynamic Range: DR400
  • Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
  • Color: -2 (Low)
  • Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
  • Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
  • White Balance: 6300K; -3 Red, -2 Blue
  • ISO: Auto, up to 6400 for “grainy” appearance (or fixed to 1000)

The recipe above is for the X-Trans II sensor; the corresponding recipe for an updated or more recent sensor is found here. All other recipes sorted by specific sensor are found here.

The following images were made at locations throughout metropolitan Vancouver. Minor adjustments to brightness level, rotation, and geometric distortion have been applied from straight-out-of-the-camera (SOOC) to posting.


( Click here for images )

Maplewood Flats, Burrard Inlet, Burnaby Mountain, North Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, five

Civilization, before colonization

In the District of North Vancouver, Maplewood Flats is a wildlife conservation area including lush green space and a set of mudflats (off-limits to humans). In this image facing east are the following place names, courtesy of the SFU Bill Reid Centre:

•   Stitsma – fishing spot for the Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish) people, an area once abundant in salmon, trout, and crab.

•   Lhuḵw’lhuḵw’áyten – Squamish for “arbutus from which bark is removed in spring”; Barnet Marine Park, formerly Barnet Mill. Now includes all of Burnaby Mountain and Simon Fraser University (SFU).

•   səl̓ilw̓ət – hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ word meaning “waters of Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm”; root word for səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ – “Tsleil-Waututh” place/residence/village in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language, meaning “People of the Inlet.” Land remnant today is Burrard Inlet Reserve No. 3.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 16 Jun 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfy.

Port of Vancouver, CenTerm, former Hastings Mill, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Coast Salish place names, four

Civilization, before colonization

•   q̓əmq̓ə́mələɬp in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language of the Musqueam people.
•   Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓ in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language of the Squamish people.

The meaning of the words is roughly “leafy maple trees”.

The headquarters for the Canadian Fishing Company (Canfisco) and the massive cranes of the Port of Vancouver’s CenTerm shipping facility provide this present-day picture at the foot of Gore and Dunlevy Streets. Recent history has this location as the home of Stamps Mill (1865, later Hastings Mill). Lining the image at right are the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway, connecting the Colony of British Columbia with national confederation and accelerating settler expansion from east to west.

The Sea-to-Sky highway between Vancouver and Pemberton has highway signs with locations printed in English and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh. Vancouver is listed as “Ḵ’emḵ’emel̓áy̓” on signs along route BC-99, even though the physical area defined by the modern city once had multiple indigenous names for settlements and landmarks before colonization.

I’m grateful to the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and səlil̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples on whose lands I was born as guest. I made the photo above on 2 Jul 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime with the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 18.5mm (28mm) focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lfs.

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