Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Austria’ category

Deutschordenshaus, House of the Teutonic Order, Deutscher Orden, Teutonic Order, Wien, Österreich, Vienna, Austria, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Teutonic Order

In central Vienna, the Deutschordenshaus building is the world headquarters for the Order of the Teutonic Knights of St. Mary’s hospital in Jerusalem, also known as the Teutonic Order. The group has roots in the Third Crusade, established as a military hospital near the Mediterranean port city of Acre (Akko/Akka) around 1190 AD/CE. The Order established satellites all over Europe, including Vienna whose presence here was established in the early 13th-century. In 1809, the Order moved its headquarters to Vienna. Graced with 17th- and 18th-century design, the building today houses not only offices, but also its central archives and Treasury (Schatzkammer). As seen on the door in the image above, the Order’s symbol is the Cross of the Teutonic Order (Crux Ordis Teutonicorum), very much like the one visible at the 1st “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner) in Koblenz.

The Teutonic Order building is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

Location: Singerstrasse 7. U-Bahn U1 or U3, Stephansplatz.

I made the photo above on 18 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/30-sec, f/6.4, ISO2000, 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glE.

Türkenkugel, Ottoman cannonball, Am Hof, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Ottoman cannonball

And I don’t mean the ’90s alt-rock classic from The Breeders.

What I mean is the gilded cannonball stuck to the side of a building in central Vienna. The shiny gold cannonball is a relic of the attempted and failed siege by military forces of the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire on Vienna in 1683; the name in German “Türkenkugel” is very literal at that (“Turkish cannon ball”). Today, this building is home to Austrian-Italian company Generali, which provides insurance and financial solutions for private customers.

Location: Am Hof 11 (Generali Versicherung AG Geschäftsstelle Am Hof). U-Bahn U3, Herrengasse. Am Hof is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

I made the photo above on 20 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/10, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gls.

My Vienna: Klimt, Moser, & Wagner in Hietzing Cemetery

Previously, I provided short biographies for artist Gustav Klimt, artist and designer Koloman Moser, and architect Otto Wagner, and why they are important figures to the arts and culture scene in early 20th-century Vienna. These three figures are buried in Hietzing Cemetery in the 13th district of Hietzing at the city’s western periphery.

Located to the southwest of the former imperial summer residence Schönbrunner Schlosspark, Hietzing Cemetery is modest in size with an area of over 9.7 hectares (24 acres) and containing over 11-thousand graves. With the present site inaugurated in 1787, the cemetery has seen several expansion phases and survived damage from the Second World War.

It’s an easy ride on the city’s U4 subway, formerly Otto Wagner’s municipal railway (Wiener Stadtbahn), to one of its stations at Hietzing. From Hietzing station, it’s a quick hop on a bus to the cemetery’s main gate.


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O5, St. Stephen's Cathedral, Domkirche St. Stephan, Wien, Österreich, Vienna, Austria, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: O5

On the exterior wall of St. Stephan’s Cathedral next to the Riesentor/Westportal (giant west gate) is the easily missed and oft-ignored memorial to Austrian resistance in World War 2. A blackened stone block with the barely visible carved “O5” appears on the wall to the right of the Westportal (facing into the church). After Austria’s annexation by the Nazis, the country name was changed from “Österreich” to “Ostmark” and to “Donau- und Alpenreichsgaue” to subsume the once independent nation. The Austrian resistance movement consisted of people who were members of banned and forbidden political parties. Placed on various buildings around the capital city and beyond, “O5” represented “Ö” for Österreich as overt sign of resistance. The capitalized O-umlaut is spelled out as O-E, and E is the fifth letter of the alphabet. Anyone caught making the sign or associated with the group was put to death.

As present-day memorial, the block itself is protected behind a transparent plexiglass shield. Set into the pavement immediately below is a memorial plaque whose inscription translates as: “O5 was the secret symbol of the Austrian resistance against the National Socialist horror regime 1938-1945. This memorial was created in memory of the murdered resistance fighters of the Austrian resistance movement. Installation conducted by President Professor Norbert Macheiner on 5 October 2000. AEIOU: ‘Allen ernstes ist Oesterreich unersetzlich‘ (In all seriousness, Austria is irreplaceable)%.”

St. Stephan’s Cathedral is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

Location: Domkirche St. Stephan. U-Bahn U1 or U3, Stephansplatz.

•   Stadt Wien: Widerstandszeichen O5, Gedenktafel Widerstandsgruppe O5.
•   Republik Österreich Parlament: Demokratie Webstatt.
•   Historical Marker Database (English).

% AEIOU is likely the 15th-century Habsburg motto for “Austria rules the world” (Austriae est imperare orbi universo); there are many interpretations.

I made the photo above on 18 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/5, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fX2.

My Innsbruck: I do not refuse the humour

It’s not really low humour, and besides, I’m not one to reject humour.

As an encouragement for everyone to keep the environment clean (aside from personal and collective responsibility), the ubiquitous red garbage or waste bins throughout the city of Innsbruck are all tagged with a succinct sentence that’s amusing and punny. I don’t abide by the stereotype that the German language can’t be funny; instead, the stereotype persists because of lazy ignorant thinking.

Many small red waste-bins or garbage cans are located throughout the Tirolean capital. With a real chance to causing double takes, the different sayings on the bins is a mix of Austrian German and English, encouraging residents and visitors to use them as intended. The bins are emptied when city staff open them from underneath. This “attraction to waste” is not a unique phenomenon, as various other cities employ a similar trick; for example, in Hamburg and Berlin. But when a waste-bin urges people to feed it, I find it hard to look away.

From over 1200 submissions for a public city-wide competition for the best slogans, 20 were selected and unveiled in autumn 2010 (Innsbruck informiert, 2010: 15 Sept and 6 Oct). Theses mottos are on hundreds of bins in the city. Below are 17 out of 20 for a 85% completion rate, which is pretty good for a few days in and out of town.


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