Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts from the ‘Austria’ category

Othmar Schimkowitz, Musenhaus, Medaillonshaus, Linke Wienzeile 38, Otto Wagner, Vienna Modernism, Wiener Moderne, Wien, Vienna, Oesterreich, Austria, fotoeins.com

My Vienna: Triple Schimkowitz

Above/featured: Musenhaus (Muse House), Linke Wienzeile in Vienna – 18 May 2018.

Early 20th-century European artist Othmar Schimkowitz was one of many key figures in Vienna Modernism, an art movement which celebrated its centennial in 2018 in the Austrian capital city. Schimkowitz was born in Hungary and became well-known in Vienna for his architectural sculptures. In 1898, he joined the (Vienna) Secession, a group of artists which included Josef Hoffmann, Gustav Klimt, Max Kurzweil, Carl Moll, Koloman Moser, and Joseph Maria Olbrich.

Sculptures by Schimkowitz are often seen in a variety of architectural creations by Otto Wagner. Here below are three Schimkowitz examples in Vienna; all are accessible with public transport from Wiener Linien (WL).


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My Tirol: Stubai alpine valley


(Spring 2018.)

After the morning to and from Scharnitz, I returned to Innsbruck, and immediately headed south into the Stubai valley for the afternoon and early-evening. I had enough time to make a short walk in each of the towns Neustift and Fulpmes, but truth told, I would’ve preferred a minimum of one full day to appreciate more fully the spring-summer rhythms in the river valley and ascend the cable cars up both Kreuzjoch and Elfer, plus another day to the very end of the Stubai valley to Mutterbergalm, and up Schaufelspitze for views of the Stubaier Gletscher (Stubai Glacier) at “the top of Tirol.”

The present description is a part of my 1-day trips within Tirol, including:

•   Alpbach valley.
•   Brenner Pass.
•   Scharnitz & Porta Claudia.
•   Wilder Kaiser.


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My Vienna: Otto Wagner’s architectural legacy

Featured: On the Linke Wienzeile, opposite the Naschmarkt at right – 18 May 2018 (6D1).

What: The Post Savings Bank building and Steinhof church, by Otto Wagner.
Why: These two are the most important architectural examples of 20th-century modernism.
Where: Throughout the city of Vienna.

To visit Vienna is to know Otto Wagner. A first-time visitor to the city will be forgiven for not knowing about Wagner or his creations, but throughout their time spent in the Austrian capital, they’ll encounter Wagner’s early 20th-century “Modern Architecture”

Vienna is for many the city of Beethoven, Mozart, and Strauss; the city of historic and stylish cafés with coffee and Sacher Torte; the city whose pride is revealed in the combined World Heritage Site that are the classic period architecture within the Old Town and the beautiful palace and gardens at Schönbrunn. Flowing through the city is the Danube river, memorialized in Johann Strauss II’s “An der schönen blauen Donau” (The Blue Danube).

The evolution of architectural style is plainly evident throughout the city. Around the Ringstrasse (inner ring road) is architecture in the Historicism style, with big nods to Neoclassicism in the Parliament, Neo-Gothic in City Hall and the Votivkirche, and a lot of Neo-Renaissance represented by the City Theatre, Art History Museum, Natural History Museum, Opera House, and the University.

But as calendars flipped from 1899 to 1900, the fin-du-siècle heralded a move to bold thinking, different style, and a change in the way and reasons why buildings were put together. Consequently, Vienna is a city of 20th-century modernism whose traces are found in art, architecture, and urban planning. Even with post-war reconstruction in the mid-20th century and a mindful push for environmental rigour in the 21st-century, Vienna still remains in many ways Otto Wagner’s city.


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Deutschordenshaus, House of the Teutonic Order, Deutscher Orden, Teutonic Order, Wien, Österreich, Vienna, Austria, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Teutonic Order

In central Vienna, the Deutschordenshaus building is the world headquarters for the Order of the Teutonic Knights of St. Mary’s hospital in Jerusalem, also known as the Teutonic Order. The group has roots in the Third Crusade, established as a military hospital near the Mediterranean port city of Acre (Akko/Akka) around 1190 AD/CE. The Order established satellites all over Europe, including Vienna whose presence here was established in the early 13th-century. In 1809, the Order moved its headquarters to Vienna. Graced with 17th- and 18th-century design, the building today houses not only offices, but also its central archives and Treasury (Schatzkammer). As seen on the door in the image above, the Order’s symbol is the Cross of the Teutonic Order (Crux Ordis Teutonicorum), very much like the one visible at the 1st “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner) in Koblenz.

The Teutonic Order building is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

Location: Singerstrasse 7. U-Bahn U1 or U3, Stephansplatz.

I made the photo above on 18 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/30-sec, f/6.4, ISO2000, 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-glE.

Türkenkugel, Ottoman cannonball, Am Hof, Wien, Vienna, Austria, Österreich, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Vienna Old Town: Ottoman cannonball

And I don’t mean the ’90s alt-rock classic from The Breeders.

What I mean is the gilded cannonball stuck to the side of a building in central Vienna. The shiny gold cannonball is a relic of the attempted and failed siege by military forces of the Ottoman (Turkish) Empire on Vienna in 1683; the name in German “Türkenkugel” is very literal at that (“Turkish cannon ball”). Today, this building is home to Austrian-Italian company Generali, which provides insurance and financial solutions for private customers.

Location: Am Hof 11 (Generali Versicherung AG Geschäftsstelle Am Hof). U-Bahn U3, Herrengasse. Am Hof is located within the city’s Old Town which UNESCO inscribed as World Heritage Site in 2001.

I made the photo above on 20 May 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/10, ISO2000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-gls.

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