Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Industrial History’ category

My Seattle: the 1st Starbucks, 1971-1976

Above/featured: Exhibition “Edible City: A Delicious Journey” at MOHAI – Seattle, 8 Jan 2017 (6D1).

What: 1st Starbucks, at Virginia/Western in the Rhode Island building.
Where: A restaurant now; no historical plaque or sign, though.
Why: 1st location between 1971 to 1976, as an historical exercise.

Many write about and refer to the “original Starbucks” location in downtown Seattle. If they’re referring to the present location in Pike Place, that Starbucks outlet while oldest is not the original.

So, what happened to Starbucks’ very first location from 1971 to 1976?


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Anacortes, March Point, Fidalgo Bay, Fidalgo Bay Aquatic Reserve, Fidalgo Island, Salish Sea, Skagit County, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on Fidalgo Island: Anacortes, Fidalgo Bay

The following monthly series is based on a trip to the annual tulip festival in northwestern United States.

In northwestern Washington State, Fidalgo Island is located in the waters of the Salish Sea, about 14 miles (23 km) west from Mount Vernon and 38 miles (61 km) south from Bellingham.

The Fidalgo Bay Aquatic Reserve lies in Fidalgo Bay. Facing east across the Bay to March Point is the tank farm associated with the Marathon Petroleum Refinery. When this image was taken, the refinery was operated by Tesoro, which was taken over by Andeavor, which in turn was bought out by Marathon Petroleum.

The trestle at lower-centre is the Tommy Thompson Trail which pedestrians and bicyclists use to traverse Fidalgo Bay. At right-centre on March Point is North Texas Road, which separates Marathon Refinery to the left (north) and Shell Puget Sound Refinery to the right (south). Cows graze on the pasture flanking the southern end of Marathon Refinery.

I made the photo above on 19 April 2017 with a Canon EOS6D mark 1 with the following settings: 1/320-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 300mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-g2v.

Anacortes, Weaverling Spit, March Point, Fidalgo Bay, Fidalgo Island, Salish Sea, Skagit County, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on Fidalgo Island: Anacortes, Weaverling Spit

The following monthly series is based on a trip to the annual tulip festival in northwestern United States.

In northwestern Washington State, Fidalgo Island is located in the waters of the Salish Sea, about 14 miles (23 km) west from Mount Vernon and 38 miles (61 km) south from Bellingham.

Weaverling Spit is a narrow piece of land jutting out into Fidalgo Bay. Once home to traditional indigenous fishing grounds, European colonization brought road and rail access connecting the island with the mainland over March Point. Since 2003, this ground is once again under the stewardship of the Samish Nation.

In the image above, the view from the spit faces northeast across Fidalgo Bay to the north end of March Point and the Marathon Petroleum Refinery. When this image was taken, the refinery was operated by Tesoro, which was taken over by Andeavor, which in turn was bought out by Marathon Petroleum.

I made the photo above on 19 April 2017 with a Canon EOS6D mark 1 with the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/16, ISO1000, and 58mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-g2h.

My Mittenwald: mountains, masks, music, Mahlzeit!

Above/featured: From the regional train: facing southwest over Schöttlkarstrasse and the eastern end of the Wettersteinwand at right.

In 1786, the German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe described the alpine town of Mittenwald as “lebendes Bilderbuch” – a living picture-book. Images and descriptions in print and provided by visitors became a real draw and lure. Funny thing is I’d stayed in nearby Garmisch-Partenkirchen several times, and I hadn’t taken the easy 20-minute train hop to Mittenwald.

I took care of that with two visits within a span of 15 months: with and without snow.

Wandering through Mittenwald is a delight because of abundant fresh mountain air, picturesque surroundings, and the compact nature of the town. The description becomes a common refrain for alpine towns.

Mid-winter is special with the combination of seeing mountains freshly frosted with snow, people of all ages wearing masks and costumes during carnival season, houses painted in colourful “Lüftlmalerei”, and the town’s special place in music history. When clear skies dominate in spring and summer, it seems like an endless vista of blue lakes along with green meadows and mountains to accompany your time outside on walks and hikes in the area.


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My Vienna: Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky, mother of the modern fitted kitchen

Who: Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky.
Key: 1st woman architect in Austria, designer of something we take entirely for granted.
Quote: “I developed the kitchen as an architect, not as a housewife.”
Where: MAK Vienna.

I always liked how cooking had well-defined endpoints: a desirable start, and a satisfying conclusion. I enjoy the process: the contemplation of “what to make,” the gathering of ingredients, the preparation, and naturally, the consumption. There might also be something to say about the duality of creation and annihilation …

That got me to thinking about kitchens as a critical unit of a home. Before the 20th-century, the wealthy could afford to have staffed kitchens; everybody else had access to no kitchen or an unsafe unhygienic kitchen in a building separate to their living quarters. The assumed universality of a kitchen within a home is a 20th-century concept and implementation that sought to overcome social and economic class. The design of a modern kitchen invites repeated patterns of movement and action around where cookware, utensils, condiments, glassware, etc. are stored and where the central focus of cooking activity takes place.


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