Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘Food and Drink’ category

Arnott's advertisement, Museum station, Sydney, Australia, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Arnott’s in the Museum (Sydney)

This post is the fourth of five Fotoeins Fridays in June, all from Australia’s most populous city, Sydney.

When I was working as an astronomer in Chile, I discovered from Australian colleagues the delectable Tim Tam biscuit by Arnott’s; the ‘classic’ caramel is my downfall. I questioned how I had gone so long without having had the beaut of a Tim Tam. For a company with long traditions in region and country, it’s fitting the advertisement shown here is mounted on the wall of a historical urban rail station in Sydney’s CBD/downtown.

I made the photo above on 2 April 2013 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-glass, and the following settings: 1/6-sec, f/3.5, ISO400, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie on fotoeins.com at https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bGb.

Taylor Shellfish Farms, Samish Bay, Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Pacific Northwest, PNW, Bellingham, Skagit Valley, Washington, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: low tide on Samish Bay in the PNW

This post is the third of five March Fotoeins Fridays from the Samish Bay area in northwest Washington State (USA). Samish Bay is a small body of water in northern Puget Sound, itself a part of the larger Salish Sea.

We’ve come to this place by design, but if you don’t already know, you can easily miss the turnoff from Chuckanut Drive. The one-lane road gently descends the cliff to the rail tracks and the water’s edge. On the shoreline in Skagit County is the Taylor Shellfish Farms where the big thing is oysters. It’s low tide, and the waters have backed out for hundreds of metres. Visible at centre is a farm employee in hip waders on the mudflats and inspecting the farm beds. It almost feels as if you can walk clear out to the islands in the distance. Almost.

I made this photo on 18 April 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/800-sec, f/22, ISO1000, and 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-aLr.

Phnom Penh Noodle House, International District, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Seattle: the tasty eats

The distance between Vancouver BC and Seattle WA is 232 kilometres (144 miles) which is a 2.5- to 3-hour drive or a slightly longer trip with the bus or train. Seattle is older than Vancouver by 27 years as incorporated cities (1869 vs. 1886), but despite the relative proximity, I’ve always been fascinated by the different paths by which both cities have evolved.

Seattle is famous for its coffee and famous for her people’s love of a good brew in a cup. With good coffee her citizens want good food. And what’s even better is that these examples won’t bust your wallet or break your debit/credit.

CAUTION: The following food photos from Seattle you are about to see may cause unstoppable drooling. If you get a terrible case of the noms, I claim full responsibility.

( Click here for images and more )

salt-making, Halloren- und Salinemuseum Halle, Halloren, Salinemuseum, Halle (Saale), Halle, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Halle (Saale): Making White Gold Since 3000 BC

What do the following six towns and cities have in common?

  • Hall in Tirol, Austria
  • Hallein, Austria
  • Hallstatt, Austria
  • Schwäbisch Hall, Germany
  • Bad Reichenhall, Germany
  • Halle an der Saale, Germany

Where Hall is more than a large covered room

With “hall” in their names, all six towns listed above are historically associated with salt production1,2,3. The word “salt” is represented in Greek as hals and in Celtic (Brythonic) as hal. In pre-Roman Europe, the towns of Halle, Hallstatt, and Hallein were three centres for salt-evaporation4 which eventually became salt-making centres for the surrounding regions of Prussian Saxony, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg, respectively. Archaeological finds around Halle and along the Saale river5 uncovered evidence of heated brine (at Doläuer Heide) from the mid-neolithic age (about 3000 BCE) and briquetage ceramic vessels from the late-Bronze age (about 1000 BCE).

Mark Kurlansky wrote1: “… Salt is so common, so easy to obtain, and so inexpensive that we have forgotten that from the beginning of civilization until about 100 years ago, salt was one of the most sought after commodities in human history.

Once a rarity, salt was a unique additive to improve quality of food preparation and consumption. Food preservation with salt also became a critical measure for survival, but also for improving the quality of food preparation and consumption. Whoever controlled salt production, sales, and distribution held power, wealth, and prestige.

( Click here for more )

Halle an der Saale, Halle, Saale river, Saale, Sachsen-Anhalt, Saxony-Anhalt, Cultural Heart of Germany, Germany, fotoeins.com

Halle (Saale): sweet & savoury highlights in the Händelstadt

Featured: “5 towers” with 4 (spires) from St. Mary’s Church (left-centre) and 1 from the Red Tower (right-centre). Händel monument is at lower centre.

You’re visiting Halle, because (I said so and) you’ll learn and discover

  • why salt also known as “white gold” was critical to the city’s development;
  • how Martin Luther and the Reformation left their mark in the city;
  • composer Händel’s birth house, his upbringing, and how he learned the organ;
  • the oldest German chocolate factory continues producing “Halloren Kugeln”; and
  • how the Museum of Prehistory houses the world’s oldest depiction of the night sky.

( Click here for images and more )

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