Fotoeins Fotografie

Apparitions & inundations

Posts tagged ‘Urban GEMS’

Brandenburger Tor, Brandenburg Gate, Pariser Platz, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Berlin

A travel writer once asked me: how would I describe Germany? Start with geography: lush forests, lakes and rivers, jagged Alps to the south, and open seas to the north. But that’s only the surface, where deep underneath there’s rich artistic and cultural heritage; and critical lessons from times of unimaginable ignorance, cruelty, and tragedy.

Her cities also form a large part of the German picture, and I’m very fond of her five largest cities. For every city, I have a selection of G-E-M-S: one Green space (G, Grünanlage); a place to Eat (E, Essen gehen); Museum (M); and something Special (S, Sondertipp). I’ve already written about Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, and Frankfurt am Main.

The German capital city of Berlin marks the final part of my series.

[ Click here for more ]

Wandrahmsfleet canal, Speicherstadt, Hamburg, Germany, fotoeins.com

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S : Hamburg

A quick survey about Germany with friends and colleagues reveals the usual “suspects”: the capital city of Berlin, Munich and Oktoberfest, and the fairy-tale castles in Bavaria.

In my continuing series on Germany’s largest cities, I turn attention to the nation’s 2nd most populous city, Hamburg, to discover some of her G-E-M-S : Green space (Grünanlage), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), Museum, and something Special (Sondertipp).

I’ve recommended G-E-M-S in Frankfurt am Main, Köln (Cologne), München (Munich), and Berlin.

This post is on the northern city of Hamburg.

[ Click here for more ]

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: München

Gems: precious stones, sparkly and shiny on sight, cool to touch, and generally very expensive to own. To view these jewels in a museum or gallery, for example, the approach would be done quietly and carefully, behind a variety of security screens.

“Hidden gems” at a given location describe special or unusual activities, sights, or restaurants visitors may not initially be aware. Truth is, “gems” are known to residents, they’re easily accessible, and they’re out in plain sight. As long as you’re paying attention, those “hidden gems” can become something entirely different.

I’ve converted “gems” into acronym G-E-M-S: a Green space (Grünanlange), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), a Museum, and something Special (Sondertipp) to discover. I’ve described urban G-E-M-S in Frankfurt am Main, Köln (Cologne), Hamburg, and Berlin.

The present post is on the city of Munich.

[ Click here for more ]

Morning light: Kölner Dom, Hohenzollernbrücke, Cologne, Köln, Germany, fotoeins.com

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Köln

What if I’ve landed in Germany, and I wanted to find less-explored aspects in one of her cities? The word “gems” might be overused, but I’ve turned the word into a handy list of “G-E-M-S”, representing a Green space (Grünanlange), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), a Museum, and something a little out of the ordinary or a Special tip (Sondertipp).

They’re not only recommendations, but I’d like the interested reader to consider places where locals go to relax, eat, and enjoy themselves.

I’ve described G-E-M-S for Frankfurt am Main, München (Munich), Hamburg, and Berlin.

The present post is about the Carnival city of Cologne on the river Rhein.

[ Click here for more ]

Frankfurt Hauptbahnhof, central train station, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, fotoeins.com

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Frankfurt am Main

Germany isn’t just about beer, Oktoberfest, or fairy-tale castles. There’s much more to find, see, and do in the country with a wide array of choices throughout the country.

But with tens of millions of visitors streaming into the country every year, are there any “hidden gems” left to discover?

The phrase “hidden gem” is mentioned as an overused cliché. Yet, the phrase can be turned over to emphasize the individual letters in “GEMS”. That word is no longer a four-letter burden or curse, because I’m creating an informative and more engaging acronym.

I shine the spotlight on places where most arrive by plane – on Germany’s five largest cities. They are Frankfurt am Main, Köln (Cologne), München (Munich), Hamburg, and Berlin.

Although it’s impossible to fit my favourites into a handful of categories, I’m listing for each city the following “G-E-M-S”: a Green Space, a place to Eat, a Museum, and something significant or Special. By design, the individual letters also work beautifully in German: Grünanlagen, Essen gehen, Museum, and Sondertipp, respectively.

I begin the series in the city of Frankfurt on the river Main.

[ Click here for more ]

%d bloggers like this: