Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts tagged ‘Upper Middle Rhine Valley’

Osterspai, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Osterspai

24 May 2016.

This image is of the town of Osterspai, near “kilometre 575” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). In town at left-centre is the Catholic St. Martin’s church, first established in town in 1076 AD/CE. Accompanying the scene are two river boats and two bicyclists in the foreground.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I show images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 70mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hMk.

St. Goarshausen, Burg Katz, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Sankt Goarshausen

24 May 2016.

This image is of the town of Sankt Goarshausen, near “kilometre 556” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). Above town (at upper right) is historical landmark Burg Katz, a reconstruction of a medieval castle and is under private ownership.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/250-sec, f/10, ISO1000, and 75mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hMa.

Kaub, Burg Gutenfels, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Kaub, Gutenfels

24 May 2016.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops allows further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This image is of the town of Kaub, near “kilometre 546” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland). Above town sits historical landmark Burg Gutenfels on the slope accompanied by vineyards.

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/200-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 50mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-hLW.

Lorch am Rhein, Rhein, Rhine, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Germany, Deutschland, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday on the Middle Rhine: Lorch am Rhein

24 May 2016.

I’m on board a Deutsche Bahn IC (InterCity) train from Heidelberg north to Cologne, along the left (west) bank of the Rhine river. The slower train along the river bank and more scheduled stops along the way allow further opportunities to photograph the right (east) bank of the Rhine. Although overcast, the mid-morning early-afternoon train means any diffuse light will originate “behind” me from the south, and the landscapes will either be front- or side-lit.

In this series, I portray images of the Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz which is the area included within the Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley) inscribed in 2002 as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This image is of the town of Lorch am Rhein, at “kilometre 540” (distance north of the Rhine Falls in Switzerland).

I made the image above on 24 May 2016 with a Canon EOS6D mark1, 24-105L glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/9, ISO1000, and 55mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-fYw.

Koblenz: 1st and 2nd Deutsches Eck (German Corner)

Above: West view to Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein. 2015 photo by Taxiarchos228 (Wladyslaw Sojka). I’ve added the following labels: (1) Seilbahn/Gondola, (2) St. Kastor Basilica, (3) Deutschherrenhaus, (4) first Deutsches Eck, (5) Memorial to German Unity (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial), (6) reclamation in the late 19th-century, (7) second Deutsches Eck.

Many will know, have seen, or have read about the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) in the German city of Koblenz. The river city has plenty to provide: visitors wander into the vineyards to sip on crisp white wine from local grapes, vacation on long cabin-boats to enjoy the river scenery, or explore the surrounding Upper Rhine River Valley.

But Koblenz is also well known by virtue of its name after the junction where the rivers Moselle and Rhine meet. By the first-century AD/CE, the Romans had built for strategic protection a fort1 called “Castellum apud Confluentes“, Latin for “the castle at the confluence”. What most commonly acknowledge as the Deutsches Eck (German corner) is not the original location. Half concealed among the trees some 200 metres back near the Deutschherrenhaus is the first location of the Deutsches Eck.

What follows:

  • a map to the area and my photos from the present-day,
  • a short history of the “Deutsches Eck,” and
  • archival images from the mid-16th century to early 20th century.

( Click here for images and more )

%d bloggers like this: