Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts tagged ‘Rhine’

Rheinboulevard, Rhine river, Rhein, Deutz, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Where am I? Smilla knows (Köln)

Smilla is a young friendly energetic Whippet who loves people and, above all, loves to run. But if I didn’t know any better, Smilla appears bored, resting her head on top of Y’s legs. It’s not entirely obvious where I made this shot. But look closer at the reflection in Smilla’s eyes …

We’re waiting for sunset in Cologne’s Deutz, seated at the Rheinboulevard on the east flank of the Rhine river just south of the Hohenzollern Bridge. Smilla is facing west across the river to the setting sun, the Dom (Cathedral), Saint Martin’s church, and the sun’s reflection on the waters of the Rhine.

Dogs, quietly they know everything …

Rheinboulevard, Rhine river, Rhein, Deutz, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

Smilla’s reflection: me (HL), Cologne’s Cathedral (Dom), Great St. Martin’s church, and the Rhine river

I made the above photo on 25 May 2016 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 L zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/160s, f/11, ISO1000, 97mm focal-length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8HW.

Kaiser-Wilhelm-Denkmal, Rhine river, Rhein, Moselle river, Mosel, Deutsches Eck, Koblenz, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Koblenz’s Deutsches Eck at night

Koblenz lies at the confluence of the Rhine and Mosel rivers, which respectively are at the far-left and -right in the picture above. The present-day Deutsches Eck or “German Corner” includes the towering Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial (at centre in the picture above). Flags placed at the Deutsches Eck represent the Federal Republic of Germany, each of the 16 German federal states (Bundesländer), the European Union, and the United States of America (in place since late-2011). The monument and surroundings are a part of the designated UNESCO World Heritage Site for the Upper Rhine River Valley.

However, this city landmark is the second version of the Deutsches Eck, and that’s the subject for subsequent explanation.

Thanks to Koblenz Touristik and Romantic Germany for their advice and support. Koblenz is one of the cities in the Historic Highlights of Germany. I made the above photograph on 25 November 2015 with the Canon EOS6D, 24-105 zoom, and the settings: 1/10-sec, f/4, ISO25600, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7Kd.

Helios Leuchtturm, Helios AG, Ehrenfeld, Koeln, Cologne, Germany, fotoeins.com

My Cologne: there’s a lighthouse that never goes out

“Why is there a lighthouse located in the middle of the city? That makes no sense!”

“Did the Rhine river once flow here? Is that why there’s a lighthouse?”

“Is the structure some kind of forgotten remnant of the past?”

“Maybe that’s not a lighthouse, but rather a beacon that lets people know about a fire somewhere in the neighbourhood.”

These are some of the questions and statements posed by Cologne residents when asked if they know anything about the lighthouse in their midst.

Located in the Ehrenfeld1 borough of Cologne is a red brick 44-metre (144-foot) high lighthouse. But why is there a lighthouse at all in the “middle” of Cologne? The Rhine river flows through the city, but the river is hardly visible from the lighthouse at a distance of about 3 kilometres (2 miles). The structure is not an actual operating lighthouse; it’s a symbol of early 20th-century enterprise from what was once one of the most important companies in Europe and marking the location of a big factory that once manufactured electrical equipment including maritime lights.

Founded in 1882, Helios2 established their presence in the town of Ehrenfeld before the latter was incorporated into the greater city of Cologne in 1888. The company once boasted a staff complement of over 2000 people, with products sold in Germany and Europe ranging from electrical generators and transformers, light bulbs, light fixtures in public spaces, and electrical streetcars. Helios also built light towers for the North and Baltic Sea coastlines, including ones at Roter Sand (Weser river estuary), Borkum and Wangerooge (East Frisian Islands), and Sylt. The onsite lighthouse in Ehrenfeld was constructed as a testing facility and never used as a navigational aid or marker. The company overextended its financial reach until Berlin’s AEG3 purchased Helios in 1905. Manufacturing operations in Ehrenfeld ceased in 1930, bringing a final end to Helios’ business presence in Cologne.

The present-day buildings which remain are used as office- and art-space. As historical landmark, the “Helios Leuchtturm” remains as part of the urban heritage in Ehrenfeld and Cologne. If the people in both borough and city have any final say in the matter, the lighthouse will never have to go out.4

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Ratskeller, Speyer, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, fotoeins.com

Speyer: typically German in the Ratskeller

Normally, my passable handling of conversant German gets me far enough in a snack-joint (Imbiss) for a Döner or the gut-busting Dönerteller. On the infrequent occasion I’m inside a restaurant, it’ll be local German fare, much of which I’ve become accustomed while travelling within Germany since 2002.

The town or city hall in every city, town, or village is often accompanied by its own “Ratskeller” (Cellar) serving wine, beer, and food in an underground tavern. At the Speyer Ratskeller, a cold and wet Friday night is in full swing, the place packed with city residents filling all available tables and seats. My host apologizes for the wait, and I reply that it’s no problem. She suggests wine while I wait: definitely not a problem.

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West portal, Kaiserdom, Speyer Cathedral, Domplatz, Speyer, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Speyer’s Imperial Cathedral at night

In the German state of Rheinland-Palatinate, one thousand years of history are present in the shape of a Latin cross within one of the largest and most important examples of Romanesque architecture in the country. Under the directive of Salian emperor Konrad II. (Conrad the Second), construction for the Kaiserdom zu Speyer (Speyer Cathedral) began in 1030 AD/CE and consecrated in 1061. As a show of imperial power, Konrad II, seven other emperors and kings, four queens, and a series of bishops were buried in the cathedral’s crypt. Konrad II, founder of the Salian dynasty (1024-1125), was the great-great-grandson of Otto I who founded the Ottonian Dynasty (919-1024) and commissioned the construction of an abbey which would eventually become the Magdeburg Cathedral. In 1981, Speyer’s imperial cathedral received the high distinction of UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Kaiserdom, Speyer Cathedral, Domplatz, Speyer, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage Site, fotoeins.com

My thanks to the city of Speyer for providing access, and to Romantic Germany for their friendly advice and support in various cities along the Rhine river. I made the photos above on 20 November 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-86m.

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