Fotoeins Fotografie

revisioning place and home

Posts tagged ‘National Geographic’

Photo Essays on the Web, May 2014

Every month, I try to highlight some of the best, beautiful, mindful, and provocative photography from around the world, both from contemporary and historical perspectives. For example, the more I read about photography, the more I believe questions asked in the late 19th- to early 20th-century still have great relevance in the 21st-century.

1. Vivian Maier: American Street Photographer

Vivian Maier was a full-time nanny to a number of Chicago families. But unknown to them and many, Maier was an avid street photographer. As the primary story goes, her work was shelved and forgotten, until rediscovered by accident in a garage sale. The Slate’s Behold describes the latest documentary on this enigmatic person.

2. “The Place We Live”

With his photographs, American photographer Robert Adams highlighted the large expanse of the central plains in his home nation: the big skies, the big vistas, and our continuous, if not insidious, urban “creep” into these landscapes. Through his photographs, Adams asked questions about where we live, and what we do with where we live.

3. The Double Take

One of the emerging trends on Image Source for 2014 includes “The Double Take”. Does touching or interacting with a mobile or tablet screen make that transaction seem more “real”? A new language has clearly developed, where the combination of sliding finger gestures combined with timed taps on the screen produces a set of actions. Where else might we go? Do we go freely into a brave new world? Check out the article and the included video. The fifth video down reminds me a lot of Radiohead’s bleak futuristic landscapes, and frankly, the video gives me the creeps … but in a thoughtful way …

4. A Look Into the World of Arab Israelis

Jewish-Israeli photographer, Natan Dvir, wanted to understand what happens to Israelis, particularly Arab-Israelis, when they turn 18 years of age. I think Dvir’s photos show perceptiveness, intimacy, and eloquence about a segment of the population that’s not well understood by people within Israel, the Middle East, or around the world.

5. Three of VII: current state of photojournalism

On National Geographic’s PROOF, Janna Dotschkal interviewed three photographers from the agency VII (as in the Roman number ‘seven’) about their continuing desire, motivation, and inspiration with photography and photojournalism.

6. Do Dogs Copy Us, or is it the other way around?

What’s life without both the tragic and the humorous; what Shakespeare might have written had he lived in the 20th- and 21st century. With that, there’s a risk at including yet another “cute” photo-essay about pets or animals. But the following series by Sophie Gamand reveals something very interesting the photographer seems to have captured in fortunate moments. The expressions of the wet dogs seem to mirror our own and very human expressions.


This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com

Photo Essays on the Web, 24 January 2014

The following photographic essays, including various “best of 2013” series, help kick off the new year.

54 Reasons Why There’s Love for Photography

Photoshelter CEO and photographer Allen Murabayashi wrote an essay describing why he loves and continues to love photography. He lists 54 reasons, and they’re all plenty good to last you a good chunk of time.

Goodbye, Madiba (Two)

We said goodbye to Nelson Mandela who died on 5 December 2013 at the age of 95. Two examples of photo-essays highlighting his long eventful life are from The Atlantic’s In Focus and from Slate’s Behold; both offer

… an in-depth examination of photography in South Africa from apartheid’s adoption as official policy in 1948 until 1994, when the election of Nelson Mandela as president ended the country’s system of racial segregation.

One of his legacies has to be “the struggle and striving for peace through perseverance, unity, and forgiveness.”

Simple and Creative iPhone-ography

Minneapolis artist Brock Davis produces iPhone photography of constructed scenes using everyday objects. They’re wonderfully simple, and they’ll make you wonder why anyone didn’t think of that before. Check out his profile and photos on My Modern Metropolis, and previously from 2012.

50 States of Lego

Based in Nova Scotia, artist and photographer Jeff Friesen constructed small dioramas of each U.S. state, made entirely of LEGO pieces. He’s also done the same to Canada’s provinces & territories. Also, read Friesen’s interview by Phoblographer here.

The 2013 Year in Review

Given the ubiquity of year-end essays and reviews, I’ll share these four:

* The Big Picture on Boston Globe,
* In Focus, on The Atlantic,
* National Geographic, and
* New York Times’ Sunday Review: The Year In Pictures,


This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com

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