Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts tagged ‘Garmisch-Partenkirchen’

Maschkera, Fosnocht, Fasching, Mittenwald, Bavaria, Bayern, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fasching, Maschkera, Oimrausch: pre-Lent shenanigans in southern Germany

This ain’t no Hallowe’en*.

This is Fasching and Maschkera in southern Germany. It’s also about about distinctions and differences by comparison with Karneval on the Rhein.

Festivities take place before Catholic Lent, and the key idea behind the wild colourful costumes and wooden masks is the very pagan origin and ritual of driving out or driving away evil spirits of winter lurking inside people and their homes and welcoming the friendly spirits of spring for a productive growing season.

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Maschkera, Fosnocht, Fasching, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bavaria, Bayern, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: pre-Lent Fasching in Partenkirchen

“These ‘hell riders’ are about to race hard …”

Around 1pm, the bicycle race “Tour de Badakurch” begins, but it’s no ordinary race. To mark the annual Fasching festival here in the Loisach river valley, the Sunday bike race through Partenkirchen involves decorated bicycles and riders outfitted with ridiculous costumes. I’m certain some folks are judging this race, and I’m also certain the race isn’t for the fastest time. I’m fascinated by the wood-carved masks (Maschkera) and the variety of colourful costumes, but this ain’t no “trick or treat”. North America has Hallowe’en in October; but, in February, the Rhineland has Karneval, and here in southern Germany there’s Maschkera, Fasching, or Fastnacht (Fosnocht). With its pagan origins and rituals to drive “evil spirits” away from people and town, festivities take place before (Catholic) Lent.

•   “Na ja, dumm gelaufen!”: 3-minute video from BR24/ARD, 27 Feb. 2017. I’m somewhere in that crowd of spectators …

I made this photo on 26 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/400-sec, f/14, ISO5000 (yikes), and 47mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-4HU.

Waxenstein, Wetterstein, Hammelsbacher Fussweg, Grainau, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayern, Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Pillars of society” (Grainau)

In winter, there’s always skiing and snowboarding in the Bavarian Alps, but a look here suggests that a walk in the fresh air (with that scenery) can also work wonders. Just outside Garmisch-Partenkirchen, the footpath Hammersbacher Fußweg stretches west to Hammersbach and Grainau with the Waxenstein mountains towering in the background. The clouds coming in and out on this late-February afternoon bring the threat of snowfall.

I made this photo on 24 February 2017 with the Canon 6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/16, ISO1000, 50mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-2Vu.

Alpen panorama from Zugspitze, the top of Germany

Visitors to southern Bavaria and the twin towns of Garmisch-Partenkirchen should aim high with Zugspitze in their sights. At a height of 2962 metres (9720 feet) above sea level, Zugspitze is the highest point in Germany, and can be reached from the Bavarian side in Germany or the Tyrolian side in Austria. As shown above, crosses appear on both Austrian and German (taller) sides. Most will take advantage of one of the following three ways to ascend to the summit:

On a clear cloudless day above and below, panoramic views from the summit include sight lines to other Alp peaks in Germany and Austria.

Zugspitze, between Bavaria Germany and Tyrol Austria, Bayern, Tyrol, fotoeins.com

Southwest view from Zugspitze between Bavaria, Germany (DE) and Tyrol, Austria (AT)

West from Zugspitze: Tyrol, Austria side, fotoeins.com

West view from Zugspitze: Tyrol, Austria (AT)

Northwest from Zugspitze: Tyrol, Austria, fotoeins.com

Northwest view from Zugspitze: Tyrol, Austria (AT) and Bavaria, Germany (DE)

North from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

North view from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany

Northeast from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

Northeast view from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany

East from Zugspitze, Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

East view from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany (DE)

Southeast from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

Southeast view from Zugspitze: Bavaria, Germany

South view from Zugspitze, Tyrol, Austria and Bavaria, Germany, fotoeins.com

South view from Zugspitze: Tyrol, Austria (AT) and Bavaria, Germany (DE)

Zugspitze, between Bavaria Germany and Tyrol Austria, Bayern, Tyrol, fotoeins.com

Southwest view from Zugspitze between Bavaria, Germany (DE) and Tyrol, Austria (AT)

Hourly regional-trains from München (Munich) reach Garmisch-Partenkirchen in under 90 minutes, and trains from Innsbruck across the border in Austria take between 80 and 90 minutes. Have a look at the German Rail or Deutsche Bahn website for times and fares.

More from the area

  • Germany’s highest mailbox with its own view of the Alps
  • The twin towns of Garmisch-Partenkirchen

I made all of the photos above on 9 October 2011. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6tt.

Loisach valley, east to Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayerische Zugspitzbahn, fotoeins.com

Oberbayern Hausberg: bovines and alpine meadows (2011)

It’s a bright autumn afternoon in Oberbayern (Upper Bavaria), and the cogwheel railway is on the descent from Zugspitze, returning to the valley base in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. The train slows on approach to station “Garmisch-Partenkirchen Hausberg”, only two-kilometres southwest from the twin towns.

Loisach valley, east to Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayerische Zugspitzbahn, fotoeins.com

Loisach valley, east to Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Train station, Garmisch-Partenkirchen Hausberg, fotoeins.com

Train stop “Hausberg”

Stepping out at Hausberg

Doors to the stuffy train compartment open out to the breeze riding down the Loisach river valley. Deep breaths expand and fill my lungs with the slightest hints of hay, fresh cut grass, cow dung, and woodsmoke. Brightly illuminated pastures beckon me forward, one foot in front of the other. Blank looks from the “bayerische Kühe” sprawled out on the grass suggest a possible course of action. Except for the part about the blank faces …

I’ve already seen a number of people in the valley as the train weaved its way down from the summit. Couples are out on their walks. Their slow gait is not representative of age or condition; their easy stroll reflects many years of familiarity with the area.

With a smile, I’ll greet passersby with “Grüss Gott”. I’m in small conversation, proceeding typically in one-way flow: “where are you from?”, “how did you learn German?”, “how long are you here?”, and “do you like the area?” My final answer often surprises them most: “ich würde hier lange bleiben, wenn ich könnte.” (I’d stay here longer, if I could.)

Within an illuminated river valley surrounded by “little” Alps, idyll has another name: Hausberg belongs right here in the now.

Loisach valley, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen Hausberg, fotoeins.com
Loisach valley, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen Hausberg, fotoeins.com
Loisach valley at Hausberg, fotoeins.com

Loisach valley, at Hausberg, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Ausserfernbahn DB train, to Reutte in Tirol, fotoeins.com

Deutsche Bahn “Ausserfernbahn” train, to Austria’s Reutte in Tirol

Tracks shared by Bayerische Zugspitzbahn and Ausserfernbahn, Hausberg, fotoeins.com

Tracks shared by Bayerische Zugspitzbahn and Deutsche Bahn

Bovine residents at Hausberg, fotoeins.com
Bovines, meadows, Alps: Hausberg, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, fotoeins.com

Simple things in Bavaria: cows, meadows, and Alps

Reaching Hausberg

Visitors staying in Garmisch-Partenkirchen can easily walk the short distance from either of the twin towns. The flat stretch of Loisach river valley is easily walkable on the paved pedestrian path from Garmisch-Partenkirchen on the way to Grainau, Eibsee lake, and beyond. Alternatively, hop on the regional “Ausserfernbahn” train from Garmisch-Partenkirchen to Reutte (in Tirol) and request to disembark at Hausberg. Another alternative is to hop on the Bayerische Zugspitzbahn cog railway on its ascent or on the way down from the Zugspitze summit.

I made all of the photos above on 9 October 2011. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-5A1.

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