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Posts tagged ‘Fagus factory’

Before Bauhaus: Alfeld Fagus Factory, UNESCO WHS

Before Germany’s Bauhaus found its first footing in Weimar, there was the Fagus-Werk in Alfeld.

The Fagus factory building is looked upon as the first building in the world for the modern architectural age, and is the predecessor to the elegant 1926 Bauhaus headquarters building in Dessau. Fagus company founder Karl Benscheidt commissioned architect and future Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius, to create and build a shoe-making factory as an artistic project. Gropius and his collaborator Adolf Meyer stuck with working floor-plans by architect Eduard Werner, and set their sights on new exterior and interior designs. Completed in 1911, the factory’s office building set a new standard for 20th-century industrial architecture with steel and glass construction and tall unsupported windows at the corners of the building.

“Fagus” is Latin for “beech tree”, and shoemaking began with shoe lasts or moulds constructed from beech wood, which were sold and distributed around the world to other companies for the productions of shoes. In the 1920s, Benscheidt developed the turning precision-lathe speeding up production, prompting growth and expansion and elevating the company to world’s top producer of shoe lasts. Today, the building is still a working factory: Fagus creates plastic lasts milled by automated machinery to precise specifications for specific designs by shoe companies. Also on-site is GreCon which produces systems for fire-detection and fire-extinguishing in industrial settings. The Fagus factory building was recognized as “unique living monument” and inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Site (Welterbe) in 2011.

With a population of over 20-thousand people, Alfeld is located in the German federal state of Lower Saxony. The town’s reach by train is 30-minutes from Hannover or 40-minutes from Göttingen, after which is a short 5- to 10-minute walk from Alfeld(Leine)1 train station to the entrance of the Fagus/GreCon complex. Visitors can walk around the working factory site, stop at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre, sit in the neighbouring café for coffee or tea, and visit the museum dedicated to the building’s origins, the building’s century-long history of shoe-making, and a general history of footwear.

Walter Gropius and others would move to Weimar to establish a centre of art, design, thought, and attitude for Bauhaus in 1919, eight years after inauguration of the Fagus-Werk.

Die Baukunst soll ein Spiegel des Lebens und der Zeit sein. (Architecture should be a mirror to life and its time.) – Walter Gropius.

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Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Lake Constance, Bodensee, Germany, fotoeins.com

4 weeks DE, 11 UNESCO WHS, 3000 km DB (2017)

Above: Foggy dawn over Lake Constance, 23 Sep 2017 (HL).

For over fifteen years, I’ve traveled with German Rail throughout the the country. I was always passing through the centre of the country; thanks to InterCity Express trains on journeys between Frankfurt and Berlin, I’d seen stops with names “Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe”, “Hildesheim”, and “Hannover”; and I’d wondered what there was to see in these places. I finally decided to stop and find out for myself.

I wrote about my return to Germany to explore the country’s central corridor from Lake Constance to Hannover. I covered about 3000 kilometres by train with a German Rail Pass. Over 4 weeks from mid-September to mid-October, I visited for the first time 11 of the country’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites (WHS):

  1. Alfeld, Fagus factory
  2. Berlin Modernism Housing Estates, Gartenstadt Falkenberg
  3. Blaubeuren, Ice Age caves
  4. Goslar, Rammelsberg ore mines
  5. Hildesheim, St. Mary’s & St. Michael’s
  6. Höxter, Corvey Abbey
  7. Kassel, Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe
  8. Lorsch Abbey
  9. Reichenau Island
  10. Unteruhldingen, Prehistoric Pile Dwellings
  11. Würzburg Residence.

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