Fotoeins Fotografie

a question of home

Posts tagged ‘Bauhaus’

Dessau UNESCO WHS: The Bauhaus Building

21st-century Modernity, from 1919 on

The chair or couch on which you sit.
The table on which you’re resting your mobile or pad.
The desk on which your laptop or desktop resides.
The light fixture on your desk or above your head.
The windows in your room, your house, or in the café where you’re reading this.

The “universal” idea of living in a house or apartment with the furnishings we all take for granted from bathroom to bedroom and kitchen to living room is a relatively young idea by historical standards. It’s easy to imagine a time where only the rich upper-class could afford and were allowed to have and live in heated furnished residences, and the poor lower-class lived in unheated homes under damp dirty squalid conditions. Past designs with its heavy stone, porcelain, and ornate decorative components gave way to steel, glass, lightness of space, to favouring function over form. Simpler designs were meant to provide universal access: to the home, and to the essentials which furnished the home.

( Click here for more )

Wittenberger Marktplatz, Rathaus, Lutherdenkmal, Stadtkirche Sankt Marien, Marktplatz, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Sachsen-Anhalt, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, fotoeins.com

Inside Saxony-Anhalt for Luther 2017 and Bauhaus 2019

I continued a consecutive annual streak going back to 2001.

I’ve set foot inside Germany at least once every year since 2001. I’d already claimed another consecutive year with a short stint in the spring, but autumn “at home” in Germany* solidly confirmed a 16th consecutive year in the country.

As motivation to trace Martin Luther’s footsteps for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017 and to learn more about the impact of the Bauhaus art and design movement for the centenary in 2019, I embarked on a press-trip in autumn 2016 to the German federal state of Saxony-Anhalt to visit these five cities:

•   Dessau – Bauhaus headquarters from 1925-1932;
•   Eisleben – where Luther was born and where he died;
•   Halle an der Saale – Luther’s death mask and hands;
•   Mansfeld (Südharz) – Luther’s formative years in his parents’ house; and
•   Wittenberg – where Luther spent a large part of his career.

The following glimpses offer a preview of my upcoming coverage for each of the five towns.

( Click here for more )

Uni-Hauptgebäude, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Thüringen, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage, Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

Weimar UNESCO WHS: Bauhaus Old and New

There’s a clear transition in time where architecture and design took a step from behind closed doors for the sole purview of the rich and royal and out into the open for public and general consumption. It’s no surprise the years from the end of the 19th-century into the 20th-century marked big changes, with Art Nouveau at the time as part of the Secession movement. Throughout Europe, rebellion and revolution were in the air, economically, politically, and culturally.

The Bauhaus movement also helped initiate a conversation, creating and fostering a relationship between industry’s machinery and artistic or cultural creativity. Bauhaus opened in Weimar in 1919, before moving to Dessau and Berlin. The rise of the National Socialists deemed Bauhaus “degenerate” and did all they could to eliminate a movement and her people deemed counter to National Socialist policy. With Bauhaus’ forced closure in 1933 by the Nazis, a number of practitioners escaped Germany to other parts of the world, including the United States and Argentina.

For their deep and wide-ranging influence on 20th-century art, architecture, and design, an incomplete list of names includes Martin Gropius, Lyonel Feininger, Gerhard Marcks, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Oskar Schlemmer, Herbert Bayer, Irene Bayer (née Hecht), Karla Grosch, Hannes Meyer, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, etc. In particular, László Moholy-Nagy would move to Chicago in the United States and established in 1937 the New Bauhaus which became the Institute of Design in 1944.

Tucked away on a university campus a few minutes south of the Weimar city centre, two important building lie across from each other: the Saxony Academy of Art1 building and the Grand Ducal Saxony School of Arts and Crafts (College of Applied Arts)2. The former is now the main building for the present-day Bauhaus University, and the latter now houses Bauhaus University’s Faculty of Design. In 1996, these two buildings formed a part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS) listing and designation for Bauhaus sites in Weimar and Dessau.

1 Grossherzoglich-Sächsische Kunstschule Weimar.
2 Grossherzoglich-Sächsische Kunstgewerbeschule Weimar, “Winkelbau”.

( Click here for images and more )

Central staircase, main building, Bauhaus Universität, Weimar, Germany, UNESCO World Heritage Site, UNESCO Weltkulturerbe, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Weimar, Bauhaus, and UNESCO

Built in 1911 by Dutch architect Henry van de Velde as the School of Arts and Crafts in Weimar, the present-day main building of the Bauhaus University represents the beginning of the Bauhaus movement here in 1919. The photo above highlights the simple elegance of the central spiraling staircase in what is also known as the van-de-Velde building. One key highlight about the “Bauhaus movement” was a shift from decorative elements to functional forms “inside and outside.” For their important contributions to modern architecture and design, UNESCO awarded World Heritage Site status to the Bauhaus sites in Weimar and Dessau in 1996.

Thanks to Weimar Tourism, Thüringen Tourismus, Germany National Tourism Board for access to places and activities in the city; and to Dorint Hotel am Goethepark for a comfortable and welcoming stay. I made this photo above on 30 April 2015 with the Canon 6D, EF 24-105 L IS zoom-lens, and the following settings: 1/250s, f/4, ISO500, and 32mm focal length. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-6No.

%d bloggers like this: