Fotoeins Fotografie

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Posts from the ‘UNESCO World Heritage’ category

World Heritage Sites designated and inscribed by UNESCO

Waitangi Day (6 Feb): 15 images of New Zealand

Above/featured: The kea is the world’s only alpine parrot and on the endangered list; on Milford Road near Homer Tunnel.

On the 6th of February, I’ll be humming “E Ihowa Atua” and “Pokarekare Ana”.

Waitangi Day is a national holiday in New Zealand to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840. As the founding document of the country, the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an accord agreed upon by representatives of the Crown (British Empire) and of indigenous Māori iwi (tribes) and hapū (sub-tribes). The agreement is named after the name of the location in the Bay of Islands where the Treaty was first signed. Despite continuing disagreements between the two parties about contemporary extent and redress, I think the conversation and interactions between the communities are at a more advanced stage of integration within the nation’s fabric by comparison with Australia and Canada.

For Aotearoa, the New Zealand government approved in October 2013 formal names of the two main islands in Māori and English:

•   Te Ika a Māui (“the fish of Māui”) for the North Island, and
•   Te Wai Pounamu (“the waters of greenstone”) for the South Island.

I highlight Aotearoa with 15 images of the following locations:

  1. Akaroa
  2. Auckland
  3. Dunedin
  4. Franz Josef Glacier *
  5. Greymouth
  6. Hapuku (Seaward Kaikouras)
  7. Homer Tunnel *
  8. Lake Matheson *
  9. Milford Sound *
  10. Queen Charlotte Sound
  11. Queenstown
  12. Southern Alps *
  13. Waimakariri River
  14. Wellington City
  15. Wellington Harbour

Asterisks identify locations within the Te Wāhipounamu area in South West New Zealand which was inscribed in 1990 as UNESCO World Heritage Site that includes four national parks: Aoraki/Mount Cook, Fiordland, Mount Aspiring, and Westland Tai Poutini.


1.   Akaroa


2.   Auckland

Rangitoto Island, Auckland, North Island, Te Ika a Maui, Aotearoa, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Auckland city skyline, from Rangitoto Island


3.   Dunedin

University of Otago, Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, Te Waipounamu, New Zealand, Aotearoa, fotoeis.com

University of Otago is also known as Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo; Māori is 1 of 3 official languages in New Zealand


4.   Franz Josef Glacier


5.   Greymouth

Flood Wall, Left Bank Art Gallery, Greymouth, South Island, Te Waipounamu, Aotearoa, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

“A New Land” in Greymouth: Flood Wall, Left Bank Art Gallery


6.   Hapuku (Seaward Kaikouras)


7.   Homer Tunnel

Homer Tunnel, Milford Sound Highway (SH94), Fiordland National Park, Southland, South Island, New Zealand

Northwest from Homer Tunnel on Milford Road with Odyssey Peak at centre in background


8.   Lake Matheson


9.   Milford Sound


10.   Queen Charlotte Sound


11.   Queenstown

The Remarkables, Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown, Otago, South Island, Te Waipounamu, Aotearoa, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

The Remarkables (and Double Cone) over Lake Wakatipu


12.   Southern Alps, by plane


13.   Waimakariri River


14.   Wellington: the national capital

National Parliament, Beehive, Kaiwhakatere The Navigator, Wellington, North Island, Te Ika a Maui, Aotearoa, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

At the national parliament: “Kaiwhakatere The Navigator” sculpture in the foreground and The Beehive at right.


15.   Wellington Harbour


Click on the arrow-window icon at the upper-left corner of the map for the legend.


More

•   Treaty of Waitangi, in brief and FAQs: from NZ History
•   Treaty of Waitangi, Nation & Government: Te Ara New Zealand Archives
•   Celebrating Waitangi Day
•   How New Zealand’s Waitangi Day differs from Australia Day: ABC, 25 January 2018

How do I love Te Waipounamu?

•   Akaroa: Akaroa’s Long Harbour with special guests
•   Akaroa: La petite ville française de Akaroa
•   Christchurch: Christchurch’s changing Red Zone
•   Christchurch: Christchurch’s Art Gallery: glass and light
•   Dunedin: Baldwin Street, steepest in the world
•   Fiordland: Cruising up and down Milford Sound
•   Fox Glacier: The slow forest walk up to Fox Glacier
•   Franz Josef Glacier: The slow approach to Franz Josef Glacier
•   Interislander Ferry: On the ferry between the North and South Islands
•   Lake Matheson: What are the sounds of a New Zealand sunset?
•   Southern Alps: Flying over the South Island’s Southern Alps
•   Southern Alps: The Southern Alps at sunset, from Lake Matheson
•   Train: Coastal Pacific train, from Picton to Christchurch
•   Train: TranzAlpine train, from Christchurch to Greymouth

•   Oh noae, I’m beached, bru. I’m beached az …”

I made the photos above in 2010 and 2012. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bjo.

Koblenz: 1st and 2nd Deutsches Eck (German Corner)

Above: West view to Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein. 2015 photo by Taxiarchos228 (Wladyslaw Sojka). I’ve added the following labels: (1) Seilbahn/Gondola, (2) St. Kastor Basilica, (3) Deutschherrenhaus, (4) first Deutsches Eck, (5) Memorial to German Unity (Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial), (6) reclamation in the late 19th-century, (7) second Deutsches Eck.

Many will know, have seen, or have read about the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) in the German city of Koblenz. Koblenz has plenty to provide: visitors wander into the vineyards to sip on crisp white wine from local grapes, vacation on long cabin-boats to enjoy the river scenery, or explore the surrounding Upper Rhine River Valley.

But Koblenz is also well known by virtue of its name after the junction where the rivers Moselle and Rhine meet. By the first-century AD/CE, the Romans had built for strategic protection a fort1 called “Castellum apud Confluentes”, Latin for “the castle at the confluence”. What most commonly acknowledge as the Deutsches Eck (German corner) is not the original location. Half concealed among the trees some 200 metres back near the Deutschherrenhaus is the first location of the Deutsches Eck.

What follows:

  • a map to the area and my photos from the present-day,
  • a short history of the “Deutsches Eck,” and
  • archival images from the mid-16th century to early 20th century.

Map + my images (A-F by HL)

The locations of the first and second Deutsches Eck are indicated by red cross and orange flag, respectively, in the map below. The approximate shoreline before 1850 is shown as a thick blue line. Click on the “arrow-window” icon at the upper-left corner for the legend.

Deutschherrenhaus, 1st Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(A) First Deutsches Eck, with the Cross of the German (Teutonic) Order at the base of the former corner tower. At centre-right is the Gate of the Knights of the German Order, leading into the inner courtyard of the Deutschherrenhaus with its own cross near the rooftop.

1st Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(B) Left-centre: cross of the German (Teutonic) Order at the 1st Deutsches Eck. At the location where I made this photo, I would’ve been treading water in the Moselle river before 1850; see the archival images (G) and (H) below.

emorial to German Unity, 2nd Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(C) Kaiser Wilhelm equestrian statue and Memorial, inaugurated in 1897.

2nd Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(D) From the Kaiser Wilhelm equestrian statue, north to the 2nd Deutsches Eck and confluence or junction of the Moselle and Rhine rivers.

Memorial to German Unity, 2nd Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(E) Facing south from 2nd Deutsches Eck: Memorial to German Unity, and flags for 16 German federal states, Germany, the European Union, and the U.S.; Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial.

2nd Deutsches Eck, Deutsches Eck, Mosel, Rhine, Koblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, Oberes Mittelrheintal, Upper Middle Rhine Valley, UNESCO, World Heritage, fotoeins.com

(F) Facing north at the 2nd Deutsches Eck, to the German flag and the confluence of the Moselle river (left) with the Rhine.


Short history of the Deutsches Eck

Near the junction where the Moselle river joins the Rhine, St. Kastor Church2 had long been present since its establishment in the 9th-century AD/CE. In 1216, the Deutscher Orden (Teutonic or German Order3) founded at the junction the Deutschherrenhaus or the Deutschordenhaus (House of the Knights of the German Order) including a hospital, all next to St. Kastor Church. The favourable location would soon be called the “Deutscher Ordt” (Place/Ort of the German Order/Orden) and later the “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner).

The Cross of the Teutonic Order (Crux Ordis Teutonicorum) appears at the base of the corner tower as part of the wall surrounding the Deutschherrenhaus. The cross would have been visible to anyone sailing the waters of the two rivers. With the symbol originating from the 13th-century as a black-and-white cross pattée, the emblem formed the basis for the development of the Iron Cross (Eisernes Kreuz) in the early 19th-century4.

Land reclamation north of the Deutschherrenhaus moved the location of the Deutsches Eck to the northeast by about 200 metres by the mid- to late-19th century. Standing prominently at the “new” Deutsches Eck, the Kaiser Wilhelm memorial with an equestrian statue standing 14 metres (46 feet) tall was inaugurated in 1897, built in acknowledgement of the 1871 unification of German lands into a greater Empire. After destruction in the Second World War, the remnants would be reconstructed and incorporated into a larger Memorial to German Unity in 1953. Plaques embedded into the cobblestone provide descriptions in German, English, and French about the context of the memorial in relation to modern Germany.

The second world war and subsequent years took their toll on the Deutschherrenhaus; complete reconstruction of the building began in 1989. By 1992 the site became home to the Ludwig Museum to house the city’s collection of modern and contemporary art. The Museum celebrated in 2016 the 800th anniversary of the Deutschherrenhaus and presence of the Deutscher Orden in Koblenz.

The Deutsches Eck and the city of Koblenz are included within the inscription area for the Upper Middle Rhine Valley UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2002.


Archival images (G-K, chronological)

Topographia Archiepiscopatuum Moguntinensis, Treuirensis et Coloniensis, Matthias Merian, 1646

(G) Mid-17th century Koblenz, facing east to the Ehrenbreistein-Philippsburg complex. At right is the Deutschordenhaus (Deutschherrenhaus) with the corner tower and gate indicated; compare this image with images (A) and (B) above. Copper engraving from the 1646 volume “Topographia Archiepiscopatuum Moguntinensis, Treuirensis et Coloniensis” by Matthäus Merian. Sources: Digitale Texte Universität Köln and Münchener DigitalisierungsZentrum.

Coblenz und Umgebung in der Brusttasche. Geschildert von Bar. von Ehrenkreuz. Coblenz 1847.

(H) 1847 map with north up: where the Moselle (Mosel-Fluß) meets the Rhine, with the Deutschherrenhaus at the corner and junction. From “Coblenz und Umgebung in der Brusttasche” (1847); sources: Stadarchiv Koblenz and dilibri Rheinland-Pfalz.

Stadtarchiv Koblenz

(I) About 1875, west view of Koblenz and the Deutsches Eck. I’ve added the white dashed line to outline the construction that would take place over the next two decades until the Kaiser-Wilhelm Memorial was inaugurated in 1897; compare this 1875 view with the modern-day view at the very top of this post. Source: Stadtarchiv Koblenz (unknown photographer).

Stadtarchiv Koblenz

(J) 1888 map with north up. Continuing land reclamation has produced the “Mosel-Werft-Bassin”, extending north from the “old” Deutsches Eck and Deutschherrenhaus. Source: Stadtarchiv Koblenz.

Stadtplan von Koblenz von 1905

(K) 1905 map with north up. The location of the “new” and 2nd Deutsches Eck is clearly labelled upon completion of land reclamation and inauguration of the Kaiser Wilhelm monument. Sources: “Meyers Grosses Konversations-Lexikon” (1905) and Wikimedia Commons.


Notes

1 After over a century of searching throughout Koblenz’s Old Town for existence of the original Roman settlement, construction in 2008 near St. Kastor church revealed the existence of a moat or trench (8-meters long, 4-meters wide, and 2.5-metres deep) for a castle dating back to the Roman Empire.

2 St. Kastor Church was rebuilt in the 11th to 12th-century, destroyed in the Second World War, and subsequently rebuilt in the mid-1950s.

3 During the medieval Crusades, the Deutscher Orden was founded about 1190 AD/CE in the port city of Acre in present-day northern Israel. The order’s present-day headquarters and central archives are in Vienna, Austria with satellites throughout Europe including Germany.

4 The Iron Cross is prominent and central at the 1821 Prussian National Monument on the top of a hill in Berlin’s Viktoriepark (Victoria Park). For the cross and hill, the surrounding area and neighbourhood are commonly known as Kreuzberg (“cross mountain”).

More, in German:

•   Regional Geschichten
•   Schängel Geschichten
•   KuLaDig: Kultur.Landschaft.Digital (“Frührömisches Kastell Koblenz”)
•   Arenberg

Thanks to Koblenz Touristik and Romantic Germany for advice and support. Koblenz is a featured city in the Historic Highlights of Germany. The featured photo at top is by Wladyslaw Sojka (via Wikipedia). I made photos labelled (A) to (F) on 26 and 27 November 2015. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-7IN.

National Monument, Nelson Monument, City Observatory, Hume Walk, Calton Hill, Edinburgh, Scotland, UNESCO World Heritage, fotoeins.com, myRTW

Fotoeins Friday: Calton Hill in silhouette, Edinburgh

8 November 2012.

In the magical city of Edinburgh, I’ve been told I’ve been fortunate to see the sun. And so it is, with the late-autumn afternoon sun that I find myself on the north side of Calton Hill with a beautiful expansive view of the Firth of Forth river estuary to the north. But I turn around and I want this, the same silhouette someone would’ve seen in centuries past. From left to right respectively are the grand but uncompleted National Monument, the telescope-shaped Nelson Monument, and the City Observatory. Calton Hill is part of Edinburgh’s inscription as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1995.

During my year-long RTW, I made this photo on 8 November 2012 with the Canon 450D, 18-55 kit-lens, and the following settings: 1/1600-sec, f/8, ISO200, 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-ahs.

Martin Luther, Playmobil, Luther Bible, Lutherbibel, Pxhere, CC0

14 for 500 on 10-31: Luther & the Reformation

Above: Playmobil Luther on top of Luther-translated Bible. (Pxhere: CC0, source tog unknown).

Why October 31 is connected with Martin Luther

In most years, October 31 is a statutory holiday in five German federal states. With 2017 as a special 500th anniversary year, all 16 federal states in Germany will observe October 31 as a statutory holiday.

On 31 October 1517, the story goes that Martin Luther strode up to the front door of the Castle Church and nailed his document called “95 Theses”. Luther’s friend and colleague, Phillip Melanchthon, relayed this story years after the fact, but there’s no evidence Luther walked up to Castle Church to pin the document. Wha is clear Luther was outraged by the Catholic Church’s abuse of power and its use of indulgences as a “guilt tax” or “get-out-of-Purgatory fee” to funnel money to Rome and finance the ongoing construction of St. Peter’s Basilica (started in 1506). What’s more likely is that Luther would’ve circulated his document among trusted friends and colleagues, and would’ve quietly sent his document as a letter to his regional Church superior, Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg. What cannot be denied is that his document was considered a provocation, questioning the supreme authority of the Church as the sole legitimate path to God and heaven. While he might not have initially guessed the full impact of his protest document, he eventually understood that it came down to matters of control and authority, and about personal choice, especially in matters of faith.

( Click here for more )

Lutherstadt Wittenberg: St. Mary’s Church (UNESCO WHS)

Above: West side illuminated by afternoon sun, 30 Oct 2016 (HL).

The Stadtkirche Sankt Marien or St. Mary’s Town and Parish Church is the oldest building in Wittenberg and is one of four sites in town as part of Wittenberg’s status as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996. Not only is this the location where Luther preached, the church also contains important relics by the Cranachs highlighting the young Reformation movement. As well as contemporaries and colleagues, the Cranach and Luther families themselves were close.

The east chancel (near the main altar) was part of the original St. Mary’s chapel built around 1280. By the early 15th-century, the chapel was incorporated into a triple-naved structure with two towers in the late-Gothic style at the west end of the new church; the Gothic tops were removed and replaced by octagonal shapes by the mid-16th century. The original pulpit from which Luther delivered his sermons has survived the centuries, and is now located in Wittenberg’s Luther House (Lutherhaus).


Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Northeast corner.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Plaque on outside wall; this is the church where Luther preached regularly during his time in Wittenberg.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Jewish memorial (1988) on the cobblestones; more in a subsequent post.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Southeast corner; more in a subsequent post.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Central aisle, facing east to the front altar.


Cranach Reformation Altar

Completed by Lucas Cranach the Elder in 1547 AD/CE, the Reformation Altar has stood in the church chancel for 470 years. The four panels represented pillars of the Reformation, and included portraits of key Reformation figures and supporters in Wittenberg: Luther, Melanchthon, Bugenhagen, Katharina von Bora (Luther’s wife), and Cranach. The altar was “repainted”, redone, and retouched in 1928.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Luther’s influence is all over the front of the altar with key fundaments to the new confession including baptism, confession, and the Last Supper at upper-left, -right, and -centre, respectively.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Predella (the base). Martin Luther at right preaches in church to the congregation at left. It’s believed the child dressed in red is Martin’s son, Johannes (Hans), sitting next to his mother Katharina von Bora. Standing at centre as expression of faith is the crucified Jesus whose loincloth appears to billow in response to Luther at the pulpit.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

Back of the altar, with the risen Christ at centre, flanked by Abraham’s sacrifice and serpents at left and right, respectively. For the longest time, this back portion was affixed to the wall and not visible at all.


Epitaph Paintings

Along the chancel wall surrounding the main altar are epitaph paintings by the Cranach family. The paintings not only honoured the specific person and family, but also highlighted visuals to support the Reformation message.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Christ’s Baptism in Jordan”, epitaph painting for Johannes Bugenhausen and his family

“Christ’s Baptism in Jordan”, epitaph painting for Johannes Bugenhausen and his family, attributed to Lucas Cranach the Younger; signed and dated on baptism water jug, about 1560.

Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558) was a theologian, priest, and a significant contributor to widening and spread of the Reformation. Confessor and advisor to Martin Luther, he performed the marriage ceremony for Luther and Katharina von Bora, and he also baptized their children. The image of Christ’s baptism refers to Bugenhagen’s own given baptism name. Above Christ and John the Baptist, the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove is connected with God above with a line of Scripture whose Latin inscription means: “This is my dear Son who brings me joy.” To (viewer) left and right, respectively, are Bugenhagen and sons, and his wife Walpurga (+ 1563) and daughters. In the background at right-centre is the townscape for Wittenberg with the just-recognizable twin towers of the Town Church and the rounded “turret-like” tower of the Castle Church. The painting implies that events pictured on the Jordan river can be transferred to Wittenberg on the Elbe river.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

“The Crucifixion”, epitaph image for Sara Cracov. Photo at large angle to line-of-sight; incomplete distortion correction.

“The Crucifixion,” epitaph painting for Sara Cracov (Johann Bugenhausen’s oldest daughter, died 1563), attributed to Lucas Cranach the Younger and Peter Spitzer, completed after 1565.

The central scene is dominated by the three crosses and crucifixions on Mount Golgotha. Below are the kneeling members of the family of Georg Cracov (centre-left) and Sara Cracov (below right); Sara was Johannes Bugenhagen’s eldest daughter. Most of the family is wearing black, except for two children who died prematurely and shown wearing white robes with black crosses. Georg and Sara’s youngest, John, did not survive birth, and Sara also died shortly thereafter. Clearly visible are the castle in the background, as well as the inclusion of a housefly on the leg of the crucified thief gazing skywards. The framing shown dates back to the 1920s which combines the painting and an original Latin inscription.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

“Christ’s Resurrection and The Harrowing of Hell”, epitaph painting for Nikolaus von Seidlitz.

“Christ’s Resurrection and The Harrowing of Hell”, epitaph painting for Nicholas of Seidlitz and attributed to Augustin Cranach; signed “HL75”. About 1582.

Working as teacher in Wittenberg, Silesian nobleman Nikolas von Seidlitz died at the age of 30 in 1582. He was subsequently buried in the Town Church. von Seidlitz is shown awake and kneeling at lower-left in a scene representing Christ’s Resurrection, a popular pictorial subject for epitaphs in the 16th-century. To the upper-left in the background is Christ in limbo pulling a woman out by the arm. Above limbo are four animal-like demons. This medieval theological theme of “The Harrowing of Hell” (Christ’s death and descent into hell defeats evil and releases hell’s victims) was repeatedly requested and ordered in the Cranach workshop, regardless of the denomination affiliation of the client.

Stadt- und Pfarrkirche St. Marien, St. Mary's Town and Parish Church, Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Sachsen-Anhalt, UNESCO, World Heritage, Luther Country, Luther 2017, Germany, fotoeins.com

“The Lord’s Vineyard”, epitaph painting for Paul Eber (source: Wikipedia).

“The Vineyard of the Lord”, epitaph painting for Paul Eber by Lucas Cranach the Younger; about 1569.

Paul Eber was professor of theology at Wittenberg University and, later, parish priest at the Town Church. The epitaph image by Cranch the Younger is at best a colourful allegory of the growing Reformation movement, and at worst a scathing piece of propaganda against Rome’s authority. In the scene of the Lord’s vineyard are two groups: Catholics at left are ripping up vines, destroying the land through negligence, and getting drunk with wine; whereas the Reformers at right are carefully tending to the vines and grapes with key figures Luther, Bugenhagen, and Melanchthon at work in the field. At bottom right are the kneeling members of Paul Eber’s family dressed in black; the five figures in white are his children who died. At bottom left is a group of clerics led by the Pope who appear to be negotiating (unsuccessfully) with Christ and his Apostles.


More from Wittenberg

•   13 highlights in the Old Town
•   Castle Church, where Luther apparently posted his 95 Theses

Except for the last image, I made all remaining photos on 29 and 30 October 2016. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-9eN.

Thanks to IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus, the city of the city of Wittenberg for their support, and the Luther Hotel for the warm hospitality. IMG- and Sachsen-Anhalt-Tourismus supported my visit to the German federal state of Saxony-Anhalt from 25 October to 3 November 2016 inclusive. I also received assistance from the cities of Eisleben, Mansfeld, Dessau, Wittenberg, and Halle (Saale).

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