Fotoeins Fotografie

revisioning place and home

Posts from the ‘Fotoeins Friday’ category

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, sixteen

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

20 April 2012: Washington, DC.

Up from the U Street Metro station at the Vermont Avenue exit is the African American Civil War Memorial, located across the street from the African American Civil War Museum. The sculpture called “Spirit of Freedom” was created by artist Ed Hamilton in 1997. The memorial reminds us of over 200-thousand African-Americans who served during the U.S. Civil War; its conclusion led to the liberation of over 4 million African-American slaves.

I made the image above on 20 Apr 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/500-sec, f/5.6, ISO100, and 23mm focal length (37mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to SK for making possible my visit to Washington, DC. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lVR.

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, fifteen

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

19 April 2012.

On a beautiful spring day, it’s an easy walk around the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC. Beginning from the Washington Monument on the National Mall, I walk clockwise to the Jefferson Memorial, followed by the George Mason Memorial and Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. Finally, the large stone blocks appear, towering over the area, with the likeness of Martin Luther King Jr. with a confident and contemplative gaze. Chinese master artist Lei Yixin created the sculpture which was opened to the public in 2011.

“True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice.” 1958.

“I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies; education and culture for their minds; and dignity, equality, and freedom for their spirits.” Norway, 1964.

I made the image above on 19 Apr 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/250-sec, f/5.6, ISO100, and 50mm focal length (80mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to SK for making possible my visit to Washington, DC. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lKC.

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, fourteen

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

9 April 2012.

Once, when a wae lad was I, I was a big fan of ice hockey. I used to think being a fan of hockey was synonymous with being Canadian; in time, I was quickly disabused of this naivety with many spotlights illuminating the long thread of racism. Generally, it’s very difficult to follow sports news in this country that avoids hockey news and updates. With unease in place, my return to a city where I lived for seven years included a return to the “Cathedral of Hockey”.

At the corner of Yonge and Front in downtown Toronto is a building formerly used by the Bank of Montreal. The building has found very good use as home to the Hockey Hall of Fame, which does a great job telling stories of small-town origins and what the sport means to people across the country. It’s also a good if slow start to see increasing exposure on black players, Asian players, and the origins and rise of women’s hockey. Under low lighting, a sudden hush floats upon guests inside the Great Hall. The space is filled with trophies and plaques dedicated to its best players. At one end of the space is what many consider the Holy Grail: professional ice hockey’s ultimate trophy, known as the Stanley Cup.

I made the image above on 9 Apr 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and these settings: 1/60-sec, f/4.5, ISO400, 24mm focal length (38mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to the E. family for making my return visit to Toronto possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lKz.

Yield, Roxy Paine, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, US, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, thirteen

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

24 March 2012.

I’m in Bentonville, AR in the northwest corner of the state. In front of the brilliant Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is a stainless steel “tree”, standing 47.5 feet / 14.5 metres tall. The sculpture is called “Yield” by Roxy Paine from his “Dendroids” series. Opening in 2011, the museum was established by Alice Walton, a member of the Walmart founding family.

While Walmart is not of concern to me, what I cared about is how I was able to visit a friend from Bentonville who attended the University of Arkansas down the road in Fayetteville …

I made the image above on 24 Mar 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and the following settings: 1/200-sec, f/8, ISO100, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lKp.

Chalchiuhtlicue, Teotihuacán, Museo Nacional de Antropología, Ciudad de México, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico

Fotoeins Friday: RTW10, twelve

10 years ago, I began an around-the-world (RTW) journey lasting 389 consecutive days, from 24 December 2011 to 15 January 2013 inclusive.

8 March 2012

The Museo Nacional de Antropología (National Museum of Anthropology) in Mexico City contains one of the finest and largest collections of ancient art, archaeological and anthropological artifacts from what is now present-day Mexico. Among the artifacts is this 1200- to 1700-year old stone statue representing the Aztec goddess of lakes and rivers. The associated caption in Spanish and English are:

Escultura monolítica que representa a la diosa Chalchiuhtlicue, consorte o análoga del dios Tláloc. Es la diosa de las aguas horizontales: lagos, lagunas, y ríos que recorren o se asientan en la tierra. Va ataviada con un tocado de banda doble, orejeras discoidales, collar, y pulsera. Viste un quechquémitl, falda, y sandallas. Se le asocia con la agricultura, las semeteras y la fertilidad.

Procede del frente de la Pirámide de la Luna, Zona Arqueológica de Teotihuacán. Época Clásica, 300-800 d.C.


(Translation via DeepL)

Monolithic sculpture representing Aztec goddess Chalchiuhtlicue (“she of the jade skirt”), consort or relative of the Aztec rain god Tlaloc. Chalchiuhtlicue is the goddess of horizontal waters: seas, lakes, lagoons, and rivers which run on or settle in the ground. She wears a headdress with a double band, disk-like earrings, necklace, and bracelet; a quechquémitl (shawl), skirt, and sandals. She is associated with agriculture, seedbeds, and fertility.

The sculpture was located at the front of the Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacán Archaeological Zone; dated to the period from 300 to 800 AD/CE.

The pre-colonial Teotihuacán site was built between 1st and 7th centuries AD/CE; for its vast cultural importance in Mesoamerica, the location was recognized in 1987 as UNESCO World Heritage Site. San Juan Teotihuacán is located about 50 km northeast from Mexico City.

I made the image above at Mexico City’s Museo Nacional de Antropología on 8 Mar 2012 with a Canon EOS450D (Rebel XSi) and the following settings: 1/25-sec, f/3.5, ISO800, and 18mm focal length (29mm full-frame equivalent). My thanks to EN and ND for making my visit to Mexico City possible. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-lI4.

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