Fotoeins Fotografie

photography as worlds between words

Posts from the ‘Jewish-German History’ category

Past and present histories of Jewish communities and culture in Germany

Europe in May: the final 14 days (of 27)

Above: “Monocle”, on ÖBB regional train near Kitzbühel, Austria – 13 May 2018.

From 8 May to 4 June 2018, I travelled through Austria and Germany for 27 consecutive days by train with a two-country Eurail rail pass. I obtained over 10-thousand frames over the four-week span: the mirrorless Fujifilm X70 with fixed-lens prime accounted for 8020 images (77%), and the full-frame Canon 6D with changeable zoom-glass accounted for 2449 images (23%). From this giant haul of pictures, the following provides glimpses and visuals to the final 14 of 27 days, including stays in Salzburg, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, München, and Köln.

(The first 13 days here)

( Click here for more )

Europe in May: the first 13 days (of 27)

Above: “Monocle”, on ÖBB regional train near Kitzbühel, Austria – 13 May 2018.

From 8 May to 4 June 2018, I travelled through Austria and Germany for 27 consecutive days by train with a two-country Eurail rail pass. I obtained over 10-thousand frames over the four-week span: the mirrorless Fujifilm X70 with fixed-lens prime accounted for 8020 images (77%), and the full-frame Canon 6D with changeable zoom-glass accounted for 2449 images (23%). From this giant haul of pictures, the following provides glimpses and visuals to the first 13 of 27 days, including stays in Innsbruck and Vienna.

(The final 14 days here)

( Click here for more )

OEBB, Ă–BB, Bombardier, Lermoos, Tirol, Tyrol, Austria, Ă–sterreich, Oesterreich

Looking ahead to Austria

(The abbreviated English version appears below.)

Ich hab’ früher meine österreichische Reise erklärt. Diesen Monat fĂĽhr’ ich eine informelle Umfrage durch:

  1. Wie viele Österreicher kennen (oder ansehen) “The Sound of Music” eigentlich?
  2. Was denken sie an diesen Film?
  3. Was halten sie davon, dass einige Nordamerikaner glauben, dass der Film Ă–sterreich teilweise darstellt?

Auch gibt’s SehenswĂĽrdigkeiten in Ă–sterreich wie folgt:

INNSBRUCK:

  • Die modernste “Ynnsbrugg”; d.h., der Ort der allersten BrĂĽcke ĂĽber den Inn
  • Hafelekar (Nordkette)
  • Zaha Hadid, ihre architektonische Erbe
  • Ausflug nach Hall
  • Ausflug nach Brenner
  • Ausflug nach Alpbach: auf der Suche nach Erwin-Schrödingers Grabstelle
  • Ausflug nach Scharnitz
  • Ausflug nach Stubaital
  • Tagesausflug nach Wilder Kaiser

SALZBURG:

  • Mozarts-Wohnhaus
  • Christian-Dopplers Geburtshaus
  • Mönchsberg, zwischen Hohensalzburg und Humboldt-Terrasse
  • Sebastiansfriedhof
  • Petersfriedhof
  • Walk of Modern Art; insb. “Spirit of Mozart” von Marina Abramovic
  • Ausflug nach Hallein
  • Ausflug nach Oberndorf
  • Tagesausflug nach Hallstatt
  • Tagesausflug nach Berchtesgaden (DE); auch Ramsau, Kehlstein

WIEN, minimum:

  • Ă–sterreichische Postsparkasse
  • Karlsplatz-Pavilion
  • Kirche am Steinhof
  • Wagner-Gebäude, Linke Wienzeile
  • Hofpavilion, U-Bhf Hietzing
  • Wiener (Wagners) Stadtbahn
  • Auf der Spur Lise Meitner
  • Ringstrasse um die Altstadt
  • Schöner Brunnen, von dem der Name “Schönbrunn” stammt
  • Zentralfriedhof: u.a., nämlich Ludwig-Boltzmanns Grabstelle
  • Hietzinger Friedhof
  • JĂĽdisches Wien
  • MAK Museum: auf der Spur Margarete SchĂĽtte-Lihotzky
  • “Art in the Subway”: z.B., “pi” (Ď€) von Ken Lum in U-Bhf Karlsplatz
  • Meidlinger Markt
  • TrzeĹ›niewski: Wiener Esstradition seit 1902
  • 1 CafĂ©: z.B., CafĂ© Korb
  • 1 Beisl: z.B., Rudis Beisl
  • 1 Heurige: z.B., SchĂĽbel-Auer
  • Tagesausflug nach Bratislava (SK)

WIEN, MöGLICHKEITEN:

  • St. Marxer Friedhof
  • Nussdorf Wehr
  • Wagner-Villa
  • Beethoven Museum, im Vorgriff auf BTHVN 2020
  • Beethovens-Wohnhaus, in dem er seine 9. Symphonie komponierte
  • Ballgasse (bei Nacht)
  • Franziskerplatz (bei Nacht)
  • Deutschordenhaus
  • Fillgraderstiege (bei Nacht)
  • Strudlhofstiege (bei Nacht)
  • Zaha-Hadid-Haus (Spittelau Viaducts Housing Project)
  • Gasometer
  • Westlicht und Ostlicht
  • Globenmuseum
  • Viktor-Adler-Markt
  • HauptbĂĽcherei am GĂĽrtel
  • Friedhof der Namenlosen
  • Grinzinger Friedhof
  • Friedhof Ober St. Veit
  • Am Himmel (Döbling)
  • Wotrubakirche (Mauer)

I described my upcoming time in Austria in a previous post. While in country, I’ll carry out an informal poll:

  1. How many Austrians know or have seen “The Sound of Music”?
  2. What do they think about the movie?
  3. What do they think about how some North Americans believe the film represents in part Austria?

The 4 lists above describe places and sights to which I’m looking forward to visiting, all made easier with a Eurail 2-country pass.

The image is from ÖBB and courtesy of Bombardier. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com at https://wp.me/p1BIdT-bQT.

Counting year 18 in Germany with an accent on Austria

Above: Vienna’s streetcar route 5, with a historical vehicle leaving Praterstern for Westbahnhof (Kurt Rasmussen, Wiki).

With two-country Eurail pass in hand, I’m in Germany for the 18th consecutive year. However, my emphasis throughout May will be in Austria. While my extended time in Austria is primarily divided among Innsbruck, Salzburg, and Vienna, I have multiple side-excursions, many of which will involve chasing good spring light and “(wide) pictures in the green.” I doubt I’ll adopt an Austrian accent to my spoken German, but stranger things have happened …

Noticeable below is no mention of Salzburg’s “The Sound of Music”, for which many Austrians have little awareness or knowledge as residents do not consider the film representative of people or country, and about which others online have already described. My interests in Austria lie elsewhere: they lie in my ability and advantage to speak German; the culture of bistros, cafés, and wine taverns; border crossings wiped out by Schengen; Jewish history; Jugendstil and Secession; salt mines; science; and urban art.

2018 is the European Year of Cultural Heritage and is also the year of Vienna Modernism, marking the 100th anniversary year of the deaths of Gustav Klimt, Koloman Moser, Egon Schiele, and Otto Wagner.

( Click here for more )

IHolocaustdenkmal, Berlin, Germany, fotoeins.com

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: observations from Germany

Primo Levi, Italian-Jewish author, chemist, and Auschwitz survivor, delivered a set of essays about life and survival in Nazi extermination camps in his 1986 book “The Drowned and the Saved”. Levi wrote:

… For us to speak with the young becomes even more difficult. We see it as a duty and, at the same time, as a risk: the risk of appearing anachronistic, of not being listened to. We must be listened to: above and beyond our personal experiences, we have collectively witnessed a fundamental, unexpected event, fundamental precisely because unexpected, not foreseen by anyone. It took place in the teeth of all forecasts; it happened in Europe; incredibly, it happened that an entire civilized people, just issued from the fervid cultural flowering of Weimar, followed a buffoon whose figure today inspires laughter, and yet Adolf Hitler was obeyed and his praises were sung right up to the catastrophe. It happened, therefore it can happen again: this is the core of what we have to say.

On 27 January 1945, Soviet Red Army troops liberated the Nazi concentration and extermination camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in south-central Poland. Over 1 million men, women, and children were murdered.

The United Nations declared January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day; the designation came during the 42nd plenary session of the United Stations when resolution 60/7 was passed on 1 November 2005.

Accepting and openly stating responsibility are critical first steps, but spending time, money, and effort to ensure the simple motto of “never again” is also an ongoing reality that isn’t solely up to the citizens of Germany. It’s a collective responsibility that we all should have to remain vigilant; that we all have to recognize and bolster actions which encourage and strengthen the universality of human rights, and reject the erosion and withdrawal of those rights.

I also believe responsible tourism includes paying appropriate respect at a memorial, especially the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. It’s my view this important memorial is not (supposed to be) a playground.

And yet, there’s something to be said about freedom in the early 21st-century which allows people to laugh and frolic in the public space, an undulating sculpture of featureless massive grey cement blocks, a testimonial to the systematic murder of millions of people.

Naturally, you have the freedom to take selfies and play here. But it doesn’t mean I’m gonna laugh with you.

( Click here for more )

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