Fotoeins Fotografie

faces of home & place-story

Posts from the ‘First Nations’ category

Susan Point, Fusion, Marpole, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Fusion,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally. About her sculpture Point writes (City of Vancouver):

“Fusion” is an artwork that marries mediums and cultures … as well as legends. It also, metaphorically, fuses natural imagery with modern methods. The sculpture is contemporary yet unmistakably Salish. As this development sits in traditional Musqueam territory and is close to the banks of the Fraser River, my conceptual art piece is based on the theme of “people of the Grass” as well as the “Salmon People” which is uniquely Musqueam. The human element within the salmon has universal appeal that symbolically relates to all peoples. The faces are revealed with traditional Salish elements. Overall, the forms represent a living thriving culture and our historical legacy; as well as this unique community today … giving a sense of place and a landmark that respects the past, present and future.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/1000-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJI.

Susan Point, Consonance, Mount Pleasant, Vancouver, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Consonance,” by Susan Point

A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.

“… Point designed this pod of swimming whales. She said that the word ‘consonance’ implies harmony and agreement among the components or a dialogue or repeated sounds. Whales dominate legends that show the interconnectedness of all life and are used extensively in First Nations art. The artist also repeated a theme used in other art she has created: the need for respect and an obligation to care for the whales and each other.”

“Public Art in Vancouver: Angels Among Lions”, by John Steil and Aileen Stalker, 2009.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/8, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJE.

Susan Point, Cedar Connection, YVR Airport, Richmond, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Cedar Connection,” by Susan Point

•   A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.
•   Connecting the landscape with the Musqueam people, the red-cedar sculpture is in the shape of a tall old-growth tree stump for the trees in the surrounding temperate rainforest; the central wavy-like features represent the waters of the Fraser River.
•   Sculpture installed 2009 at Vancouver International Airport, (landside) inside the covered passage between the Canada Line station and the domestic terminal.

I made the photo above on 5 Dec 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/500-sec, f/11, and ISO1000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJB.

Susan Point, Blue Herons, TASC1, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, First Nations, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: “Blue Herons,” by Susan Point

•   A Coast Salish artist from Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, Susan Point is highly acclaimed, both nationally and internationally.
•   “Blue Herons“, originally commissioned for the Richmond Olympic Oval.
•   Shown above is the 3rd of 3 panels, carved and painted red cedar.
•   Blue heron surrounded by salmon on the Fraser River; animals and physical setting vital to the Musqueam people, their culture and history, and to the health of the regional ecosystem.
•   Panels installed 2008 within the Technology & Science Complex 1 (TASC 1) at Simon Fraser University.

I made the photo above on 8 Nov 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens 18.5/28 prime and the following settings: 1/60-sec, f/3.6, and ISO4000. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-kJz.

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

Vancouver: Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School

In late-May 2021, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announced the discovery of 215 children buried in a mass grave at a former residential school near Kamloops, British Columbia; ground-penetrating radar was used to locate the remains.

During a period of 160 years, the Government of Canada in concert with churches constructed residential schools in a state-sponsored process of “aggressive assimilation” to make children of Indigenous people “less aboriginal and more white” with instruction in English and Christianity in order to erase the children’s traditions and cultural ties.

More than 150-thousand children were sent to some 130 residential schools across Canada between 1830s and the 1990s. Forcibly removed from their homes and parents, children of Indigenous peoples were forced into the schools where they faced neglect and physical and sexual abuse. Physical records indicate a total of over 4000 children deaths; the actual number is very likely much higher. Many children were not buried properly, parents were not notified about what happened to their children: many children who were forced into residential schools never returned home. For years, survivors have told their stories about what happened inside those schools: there is every expectation more mass graves and more children will be found.

The systematic removal of indigenous children from their families disrupted, divided, and destroyed living generations of indigenous families, robbing people of their respective culture and language and the wealth of lived experiences shared between generations. According to the terms and definitions laid out in the 1948 United Nations’ Convention, Canada committed genocide against their Indigenous Peoples. The destructive effects of white colonialism upon Indigenous Peoples in the country is not only historical but continues today with inequity, intransigence, obstruction and obfuscation, and injustice.

A makeshift memorial was quickly created at the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery at Robson Square. It’s worth noting the Art Gallery is presently housed in the former provincial court house which opened in 1911 and would have served as a “legal” instrument of white- and settler-colonialism. That this National Historic Site is the location of an improvised tribute to the loss of life and dignity caused by state-sponsored acts of genocide is an enormous juxtaposition.

June is National Indigenous History Month in Canada.


Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com
Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

“Are we human?”

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com
Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

“Bring our children home.”

Memorial for the Kamloops Residential School, Robson Square, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

As a resident of Vancouver, I’m a guest on unceded traditional territory and land of the Coast Salish First Nations: Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), Stó:lō and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh), and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). I made all images above on 1 June 2021 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-l2C.

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