Fotoeins Fotografie

photography as worlds between words

Posts from the ‘First Nations’ category

Continental Divide, New Mexico, Navajo Nation Off-Reservation Trust Land, Navajo Nation, I-40, Interstate 40, United States, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: I-40 and US-66 at Continental Divide, NM

To kick off 2019, I begin with glimpses from the road over two weeks this past autumn in the American Southwest.

Traveling west on Interstate 40 (I-40) towards Flagstaff, the town of Continental Divide in New Mexico sits on top of the geographic feature known as the continental divide, defined as “the main series of mountain ridges in North America, chiefly the crests of the Rocky Mountains, forming a watershed separating the rivers flowing east into the Atlantic Ocean/Gulf of Mexico from rivers flowing west into the Pacific Ocean.” Off I-40, you reach a frontage road that is old US route 66 (US-66) along which there are shops and a big gas station. The view here faces northwest to two east-west railroad tracks and towards Navajo Nation lands in the distance. The town of Continental Divide is 112 miles east from Albuquerque and 49 miles west from the New Mexico-Arizona state border at Lupton.

I made the pictures here on 12 October 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-czy.

I-40, Interstate 40, US-66, US route 66, Continental Divide, NM, USA, fotoeins.com
National Aboriginal Celebration, Canada Place, Vancouver, BC, Canada, fotoeins.com

My Vancouver: National Aboriginal Celebration 2017

In Canada, National Aboriginal Day is held on the same day as (northern) summer solstice to celebrate language, culture, and tradition on the longest day of the year. In 1996, then Governor-General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc, proclaimed June 21 as National Aboriginal Day since 1996, although the day is not a statutory holiday across the country. Events in the Vancouver area were also held the previous weekend as part of National Aboriginal Celebration, including an all-Saturday event at Canada Place. I highlight the performance by Pascale Goodrich-Black and La Vallée des Loups, also as part of the simultaneous Festival d’été francophone de Vancouver (Summer Francophone Festival of Vancouver).

The Canadian Prime Minister announced that as of 2018 the National Aboriginal Day will be modified to become National Indigenous Peoples Day to include First Nations, Inuit, and Métis indigenous peoples.

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"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: 2 cultures, 1 ocean (Seattle SAM)

Something bright red and green catches my eye.

Imbedded in bright red, I see an elongated “eye” whose shape is familiar and prevalent within First Nations’ art from the Pacific Northwest (northeast Pacific). I’m also acquainted with that shade of green, not only from Chinese jade but also with the “pounamu” or “greenstone” from New Zealand.

In the Seattle Art Museum, the “Pacific Currents” display represents a variety of cultures across the big (western) ocean. I can’t say I’m surprised why I’m greatly attracted to this piece of art, a piece which represents my place of birth and a place of renewal.

The caption accompanying this beautiful green-red sculpture reads:

Canoe/Waka, 2007.

Blown and sand-carved glass, pounamu (New Zealand jade), red sealing wax.

Preston Singletary (Tlingit, born 1963) and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Māori, born 1972).

Collection of Preston Singletary.

“Revivals of traditional watercraft-building among Pacific Northwest indigenous people and Māori of New Zealand have become a catalyst for composing songs and dances, creating masks and regalia, and reviving oral traditions. In Canoe/Waka, the artists pay homage to the canoe as a vessel of knowledge. Gardiner carves pounamu – associated with chiefs and expressions of peace – as the canoe prow while Singeltary sand-carves the glass that forms the canoe’s structure.”

"Canoe/Waka", Preston Singletary, Tlingit, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner, Maori, Seattle Art Museum, SAM, Seattle, USA, fotoeins.com

“Canoe/Waka”, by Preston Singletary and Lewis Tamihana Gardiner


I made the photos on 9 February 2017. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9KT.

Treaty of Waitangi, Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: New Zealand Treaty of Waitangi

In New Zealand, February 6 is a public national holiday known as Waitangi Day, marking the 1840 signing between the English and the Maori of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi). This treaty became the founding document for present-day New Zealand. While Maoris and non-Maoris coexist in relatively good, peaceful, and cooperative terms, the language providing guidance from the Treaty of Waitangi and the “appropriate translation” remain contentious. What happens next will pave the way forward not only for the future of New Zealand, but also for native and non-native cooperation and relations for other nations in the south Pacific. The Archives New Zealand holds the “original” paper and parchment documents which make up the Treaty of Waitangi.

A second nation-wide referendum was held in 2016 on a choice between the existing national flag and a new version for the flag. With voter turnout at almost 68-percent and over 2.1 million votes cast, the people of New Zealand voted to retain the existing flag by a 57-to-43 margin. Other commonly seen flags for the country are described here.


I made composite photos above of the display representing the Treaty of Waitangi display at the national Te Papa Museum in Wellington, New Zealand on 13 October 2010. First appearing here, the present post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-9od.

Honu, green sea turtle, Halona Cove, Oahu, Hawaii, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: sacred green ‘honu’ (Oahu)

With plenty of places along the South O’ahu coastline to stop for the view, one of the most memorable is the Hālona Blowout Lookout, and I catch sight of the sacred “honu”. “Honu” in Hawaiian is the green sea turtle, which to some first Islander families is a sacred deity not to be harmed or consumed. The green sea turtle is an endangered species, and according to NOAA Fisheries’ Pacific Islands Regional Office: “all green sea turtles in the Pacific Islands Region are protected by the Endangered Species Act.”

The Hālona Blowout Lookout and Beach Cove are about 30- and 40-minutes drive from Honolulu’s Ala Moana Center and the city’s international airport, respectively.

I made the photo with the Canon PowerShot A510 on 22 January 2007. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-8G3.

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