Fotoeins Fotografie

questions of place & home

Posts from the ‘First Nations’ category

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Navajo Code Talkers Memorial

(October 2018.)

Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup was once an important railway depot town big on coal transports, but now is a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway. Gallup is also considered an unofficial capital of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and gateway into Indian country.

In various visible ways, the town honours the Navajo Code Talkers who were from the Gallup area and served in the Pacific Theater of the Second World War. In the plaza in front of the county courthouse is a veterans’ memorial and walkway with column markers to the Spanish-American War, World War 2, Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf. One column highlights and honours members of the Navajo Nation who served as Code Talkers in the Pacific Theatre of World War 2.

If it were not for the Navajos, the Marines would never have taken Iwo Jima.

– Major Howard Conner, 5 Marine Division Signal Officer.

I made all pictures on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-izT.


Veteran's Memorial, Courthouse Square, McKinley County Courthouse, Navajo Code Talkers, World War 2, US Marine Corps, Pacific theater, Navajo Nation, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Navajo Code Talkers Memorial.

Veteran's Memorial, Courthouse Square, McKinley County Courthouse, Navajo Code Talkers, World War 2, US Marine Corps, Pacific theater, Navajo Nation, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Navajo Code Talkers Memorial.

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Navajo Code Talkers exhibit

(October 2018.)

We stopped in Gallup, New Mexico, for a few hours on our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup is considered an unofficial capital of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and gateway into Indian country. Formerly a busy railway depot town big on coal transports, Gallup is now a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

Inside the Gallup-McKinley County Chamber of Commerce is a small exhibition about the Navajo Code Talkers. A key painting by local artist Theresa Potter was unveiled on National Navajo Code Talkers Day in 1982. The accompanying caption reads:

Theresa Potter (1933-1986) was awarded the Navajo Code Talker’s first Medal of Merit in 1984 in recognition of her many years of active support and contributions to the association. In spite of her arthritically-crippled hands, she was a well-known artist who specialized in Southwestern scenes and themes. In 1976, she painted a picture portraying four Code Talkers in a jungle setting, but with visions of their homeland beyond the sacred rainbow. The painting was donated to the Navajo Code Talkers, along with another painting called “Reminiscences.”

I made the picture above on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/60-sec, f/4, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-izK.

Navajo Code Talkers, World War 2, US Marine Corps, Pacific theater, Navajo Nation, Gallup, New Mexico, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday in Gallup: Navajo Code Talkers mural

(October 2018.)

We stopped in Gallup, New Mexico, for a few hours on our 1-day drive from Santa Fe west to Flagstaff. Only 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the New Mexico-Arizona border, Gallup is considered an unofficial capital of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and gateway into Indian country. Formerly a busy railway depot town big on coal transports, Gallup is now a stop for weary drivers on today’s I-40 interstate highway.

The town honours the Navajo Code Talkers who served in the Second World War. The 2001 wall mural along South 2nd Street by Be Sargent commemorates the Navajo Code Talkers who were recruited by the U.S. Marine Corps for service in the Pacific Theater during World War 2. Their own Navajo code was never broken during the war. The mural shows the men as they were young and later as aged, as well as various animals familiar to the area.

I made the picture above on 12 Oct 2018 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the settings: 1/500-sec, f/11, ISO1000, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ilb.

Space Needle, that tower again, Alki Beach, West Seattle, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: native Seattle, Alki Beach Park

For a late-winter afternoon in West Seattle, Alki Beach offers a quiet and breezy respite from the hustle and bustle of the downtown area which as the cityscape (and the presence of the Space Needle) shows is only a few miles away. The differences come as no surprise: the pace is slower, the sensibility is uncomplicated, outlook and livelihood directed by the adjacent waters of the Salish Sea (Puget Sound).⁣⁣⁣⁣
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⁣⁣⁣⁣Perhaps it’s the latter what the indigenous Duwamish and Coast Salish people were pondering when a group of white settlers in the Denny party came ashore in November 1851. With his own group, Chief Seathl (siʔaɫ, Si’ahl, Sealth) of the Duwamish and Suquamish tribes arrived to meet the strangers from the sea. Today, a monument and various plaques around Alki Beach Park highlight how the Denny party attempted to start their new life in what is now West Seattle, before they pulled up stakes and moved the following April onto the high ground next to the muddy flats of what is now the Pioneer Square District. ⁣⁣⁣⁣
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⁣⁣⁣⁣In its place, the city might have once been called “New York Alki” by early white settlers, but eventually, the growing city would take the name of the indigenous chief.⁣⁣⁣⁣ The intervening decades would see competing views of “place-stories” to fit future dreams and mourn the apparent loss of the “pristine past” without any acknowledgment of responsibility; both could and would be used to sell the image of the city.
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I acknowledge my visit to the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Duwamish (Dxʷdəwʔabš) People past and present, and honour with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe (src). I made the photo above on 6 March 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime and the following settings: 1/60-sec, f/11, ISO 800, and 18.5mm focal length (28mm full-frame equivalent). This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-h9L.

The Troll II, Alison Marks, Tlingit, The Troll, Fremont, Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: native Seattle, The Troll II

Inside the museum, I turned the corner and I saw a representation of a troll with its hand on a half-buried car to the lower-right.

Wait a sec … that’s very familiar.

In acknowledgement of one of Seattle’s sculptural landmarks The Fremont Troll, indigenous Tlingit artist Alison Marks produced her version, “The Troll II”, for the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Washington. Marks states:

The Troll II, Alison Marks, Tlingit, The Troll, Fremont, Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, fotoeins.com

Alison Marks, about her “The Troll II” in reference to The Fremont Troll.

Alison Marks became the first Tlingit woman to carve and raise a totem pole when her pole was raised in Yakutat, Alaska on 27 October 2019.

⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣I acknowledge my visit to the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Duwamish (Dxʷdəwʔabš) People past and present, and honour with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe (src). I made the photos above on 5 March 2020 with a Fujifilm X70 fixed-lens prime. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotografie at fotoeins DOT com as https://wp.me/p1BIdT-ha5.

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