Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪
Wartburg Castle, Eisenach, Thuringia, Germany, fotoeins.com

Fotoeins Friday: Eisenach Wartburg at night

The light spring rain makes gentle syncopated patter on the surrounding forest canopy and against the stone walls and roadwork. Pitty pat, pit pit pat …

In the distance a spotlight fires up, announcing its presence with the soaring beam piercing through the mist. In the fading daylight, it’s become abundantly clear the mystery in this picture has remain unchanged over centuries.

As a part of exile at Wartburg Castle in Eisenach, Martin Luther translated the New Testament from Greek into German (1521-1522), giving accessibility of the book to the general population for the first time. This marked an eventual shift of requiring intercession from priests to a direct relationship betweeen people and God. Wartburg Castle gained UNESCO World Heritage Status in 1999 for the surrounding forested beauty and the site’s historical significance.

I’m grateful to Thüringen Tourismus and the Germany National Tourism Board for supporting and providing access to places and activities in the region. I made the photo above on 25 April 2015 with the Canon EOS6D, 24-105 glass, and the following settings: 1/160-sec, f/4, ISO5000, and 24mm focal length. This post appears on fotoeins DOT com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-77V.

5 Responses to “Fotoeins Friday: Eisenach Wartburg at night”

  1. Worms: world’s largest Reformation Monument | Fotoeins Fotografie

    […] In April 1521, Luther was ordered to appear at the Diet (Imperial Parliament) convening in Worms. In the presence of Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Fifth, Luther held firm against charges of heresy and refused to recant. What’s amazing is that Luther survived the triumphant journey from Wittenberg to Worms and, with his subsequent status as “outlaw” from the imperial edict following the Diet, Luther survived departure from Worms because his benefactor, Friedrich III, secretly arranged for Luther to be “kidnapped” and brought to safety at the Wartburg Castle in Eisenach. […]

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