Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between 🇨🇦 and 🇩🇪
English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

My Vancouver: western beaches in winter (2012)

It’s easy to forget Vancouver has a number of beaches on both sides of Burrard Inlet. Returning to my hometown to begin my year-long around-the-world (RTW) trip was a good opportunity to revisit a number of places I hadn’t seen or visited in decades. One area was the “western beaches”; namely, Jericho Beach, Locarno Beach, and Spanish Banks along the northwest shoreline of the city.

While the summer is an obvious time to visit, I chose the winter (February), because I believe the beaches are beautiful at any time of year. With a light sweater or fleece and a waterproof windbreaker jacket on top, anyone is more than ready to head out to the beach for a walk, a bicycle ride, or even, wander out into the water for sailing, kayaking, or paddleboarding.

For its flat terrain and easy beach access, Jericho Beach was once the site of a First Nations village, before the land was taken over for use as a military base and, subsequently, a logging camp in the last-half of the 19th-century. In reference to Jeremiah (Jerry) Rogers’ logging operation in the area, “Jerry’s Cove” was likely corrupted over time to become “Jericho”.

To the west of Jericho Beach is Locarno Beach, which is more of a “quiet” area. By comparison with adjacent beaches, Locarno Beach is smaller, feels more intimate, and frequented by locals, couples, and young families. The City of Vancouver notes:

Before the European settlers arrived, this site was home to a First Nations Village called Eyalmu, roughly translating to “good camping ground.” Spanish explorer Narvaez noted it in his journals in 1791. It was named in 1925 by the Municipality of Point Grey after having been purchased from the Provincial Government (of British Columbia). The name comes from the Locarno Pact, an agreement which outlawed war signed in Locarno, Switzerland in 1925.

Farther west is a broad expanse of beachland called the Spanish Banks, known to the local First Nations as “Pookcha”, or “the back of the whale rising and falling.” The area is named for the meeting in 1792 between English Captain George Vancouver and Spanish Captains Cayetano Valdés y Flores and Dionisio Alcalá Galiano; this event has also given the name, English Bay, to the nearby body of water where the meeting took place. At low tide, the waters of English Bay recede to about one kilometre from shore. As a result, Spanish Banks expands to become a very large muddy tidal flat on which to walk and explore – with a good set of waterproof boots, of course.


English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Hobbyists at Royal Vancouver Yacht Club

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Showers for a different season, Jericho Beach

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Royal Vancouver Yacht Club

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Corner hut

Georgia Strait, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Georgia Strait, Howe Sound, and all dem Coastal Mountains

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

A sitting log, waiting for the summer: Jericho Beach

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada – 11 Feb 2012

English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Pickup

English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Two ways of “a day out sailing”

Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Duet, Jericho Beach

English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Trio

English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

“UBC 25”

English Bay, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Paddle boarding, a rental

Locarno Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Locarno Beach in February

Georgia Strait, Vancouver, BC, Canada

BC Ferries between Horseshoe Bay and Departure Bay

Locarno Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Heading out to open water

Georgia Strait, Vancouver, BC, Canada

A day out, in mid-February

Locarno Beach, Vancouver, BC, Canada

A family arrangement, Locarno Beach

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Low tide: Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Reflective strips, Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Feeding at low tide, Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Receded shoreline at Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Could someone walk directly to the CBD?

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Wading out at low tide, Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Solitary contemplation, Spanish Banks

Spanish Banks, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Across English Bay to West End skyline, Spanish Banks


These beaches can be reached by car or by public transit on Translink routes 4, 44, 84, or C19.

I made these photos on 11 February 2012. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com as http://wp.me/p1BIdT-1Kb.

5 Responses to “My Vancouver: western beaches in winter (2012)”

  1. Christina

    You love Vancouver, don’t you! Great eye for motives, too. You make me want to go back to beautiful Vancouver. Haven’t been to most of the beaches. Only been to Kitsilano and English Bay!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • fotoeins

      Hi, Christina! Believe it or not, I had folks like you in mind when I wrote this post. 😉 Many visitors will certainly visit the beaches at Stanley Park, Kits, and English Bay, but perhaps not the three “western” beaches or even Ambleside in West Vancouver. If the photos provide additional motivation to visit, then surely, that’s thanks enough, oder? Well, okay, a drink or two the next time we meet would be good, too. 🙂 Thanks for reading and for your comment!

      Like

    • fotoeins

      Yes, do! They’re worth visiting at any time of the year, except perhaps when it rains. As you saw in the post, winter is fine, too, but dressing appropriately with interior fleece and exterior windbreaker would be good. 🙂 Thanks for your comment, Jen!

      Like

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