Fotoeins Fotografie

the visible wor(l)d, between Canada & Germany

Madrid Atocha

Before traveling to Granada for a week-long meeting in May 2009, I spent a few days visiting the Spanish capital city of Madrid.

I spent a busy afternoon in Madrid visiting two important art museums: Museo Nacional del Prado, and Museo Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. Later that evening, I changed gears and made my way to Estación de Madrid Atocha, which is the largest train station in Madrid.

I’m drawn to trains and to train stations. Like planes and airports, the terminals are places where I think about starting a journey, not ending one. Where shall I go next? A high-speed express train to Barcelona, or destinations in southern Spain?

At 830pm, there were many people rushing in and out of the station – many in and out of the Metro, and some of them rushing to catch their trains to Córdoba and Sevilla.

Facade, old Atocha
Building facade and entrance, old Atocha terminal.

Departures area, Atocha
Departures area into the ‘new’ terminal: a Córdoba o Sevilla hoy noche?

Turtle garden, Madrid Atocha
Tropical garden: not in a hurry; do the turtles have it right?

Old terminal, Madrid Atocha
Interior of the old terminal.

The initial terminal began operation in 1851. After fire destroyed most of the building, reconstruction was completed and the second terminal was opened in 1892. After renovations in 1992, the ‘old’ terminal became a large entry hall/mall with cafés, seating, and tropical gardens. There’s an interesting parallel with the landside-airside division of airport terminals, as the ‘old’ Atocha appears to be the landside counterpart to the ‘new’ railside terminal.

Overall, Atocha station is much larger now, and consists of the Madrid Atocha Cercanías and Madrid Puerta de Atocha stations for Spanish national railways, and the Atocha Renfe station for the Madrid underground metro-transit system.

Additional information:

I made the four photos above on 9 May 2009. This post is published originally on Fotoeins Fotopress (fotoeins.com).

4 Responses to “Madrid Atocha”

I'd love to hear from you; please enter your comments below

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: