Posts from the ‘Travel’ category

Fotoeins Friday: Scotland’s Referendum – Leave or Stay?

The Antarctic flyby, QF63 SYD-JNB

On a plane again: it’s either a prayer or a curse.

I summon the sleep gods on this 14-hour flight, and going over this very large body of water seems like an eternity.

Over the last few years, I’ve become accustomed to 10-hour “shuttles” between Chile and the United States, and I’ve trained mind and body to divide 10-hour flights into three easy-to-digest chunks between take-off and landing: (1) dinner; (2) an attempt at sleep, movies, or reading; and the final third that is (3) breakfast.

But it’s always been the case that the extra flying hours beyond the 10 mark can be a big mental block.

Sometimes, the goal is the motivation. On this 14-hour flight, Cape Town is the destination.

Qantas flight 63 is a non-stop flight from Sydney, Australia to Johannesburg, South Africa, and it’s at the latter where I’ll transfer onto another plane to Cape Town.

Grazing Antarctica over the Indian Ocean, QF63 SYD-JNB, fotoeins.com

Grazing the continent (Instagram)

This ‘marathon’ flight takes place mostly over the Indian Ocean, the third largest on the planet.

On a flat surface, the shortest route between two points is a line, but on a curved surface, the shortest route is a curved path (i.e., great circle). QF63’s flight path takes us over the South Indian Ocean, and the plane skirts past the edge of Antarctica, on the side opposite to South America.

About halfway into the flight, I’m standing in the rear galley of this jumbo jet plane, and I’m looking out the window. The optics through the window are weird, giving a weird warped view of the world outside. I’m leaving nose prints on the interior plexiglass screen.

Sure enough, there it is.

Grazing Antarctica over the Indian Ocean, QF63 SYD-JNB, fotoeins.com

Grazing the continent (Instagram)

Peeking under cloud cover is a hint of land below.

Under the rippling deck lies the great southern continent of Antarctica.

That’s what the plane’s in-flight displays say, too.

Our plane’s path glances over the continent of Antarctica; the display helpfully supplies geographic information, locating Argentina, Brazil, and Chile as well.

How do I feel?

Nostalgic.

There’s loss, too. I’m not going to see Antarctica on this trip, and I have no plans to do so in the near future.

After 5 years in Chile, what I miss most are the people with whom I worked, my friends and colleagues. Perhaps this “near miss” is a reminder, that I should return to South America sometime soon in the future.

Approaching South Africa, I’ve just departed Australia, after ten weeks among friends in some of the most beautiful spots around. I feel loss and separation from friends and country.

As sure as I’m moving forward on this around-the-world journey, I’m confident I’m coming back someday soon.

On board Qantas flight QF63 SYD-JNB, I made the photos above on 10 October 2012 with a 4th-generation iPod Touch. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

Fotoeins Friday: Caged in Nassau

Fotoeins Friday: Stadionauge, the eye of Hertha Berlin

Instants in tempo: Berlin Hauptbahnhof

Welcome to Berlin, signage, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

“Willkommen in Berlin” | Welcome to Berlin (Instagram)

I love Berlin.

I love train stations.

These two preoccupations always converge at the Berlin Hauptbahnhof (central train station). Looming overhead is the large glass roof, like the temple of transport hanging over scurrying passengers; trains pass overhead as the shops reside below; tempting scents from baked goods and grilled bratwurst waft from neighbouring stands; calm measured station announcements and excited conversations in the air is punctuated by screeching brakes of trains entering the station.

I’ve always had a love of transport infrastructure and fascination with transport logistics. I’ll always set aside some time to hang out at the central train station. I’ll come here to observe and, even surrounded by noise, to meditate. I’ll wander through each floor, across the platforms, up and down on the escalators between levels. I’ll watch residents head out to work, going shopping, meeting friends, returning home to their families; it’s easy to pick out new visitors to the city, as they step out into the grand hall towering over the tracks, eyes wide and shiny in anticipation of their visit to the German capital.

From around the city, region, and the country, there are S-Bahn and U-Bahn trains; regional trains; and Eurocity, InterCity, and InterCity Express trains. Converging at this Hauptbahnhof focal point are trains from all corners of the country and beyond.

And if you’ve just arrived on a train and stepped out onto the platform, you might see the overhead sign that greets you: “willkommen in Berlin”.

You might wonder why your welcome is sponsored by Bombardier – they produce trains for Berlin’s S-Bahn urban rail network.

Above all, this place represents my kind of hope: a hope for people from the outside to see what an energetic place this is, and a hope for residents to accept and embrace new ideas from the outside.

Up and down, Gleis 14, Platform 14, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

Auf Gleis 14 | On platform 14 (Instagram)

Mr. Pink, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

Mr. Pink, under the S-Bahn trains (Instagram)

Platform 3, Platform 4, Section E, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

“3E and 4E” (Instagram)

2nd floor above ground, 2nd floor below ground, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

2. Obergeschoss & 2. Untergeschoss | 2nd floor above & 2nd floor below ground (Instagram)

Up and up, escalators, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

“Folks on the up and up” (Instagram)

Golden light, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

“das Sonnenlicht vergoldet die Hauptstadt …” | golden light blankets the German capital (Instagram)

DAS ist Berlin, Berlin Hauptbahnhof, Berlin Central Station

“DAS ist Berlin” | THIS is Berlin (Instagram)

I made all of the photos above with a 4th-generation iPodTouch in 2012 and 2013. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

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