Posts from the ‘Travel Planning’ category

Saving money with German Rail Pass, Nov-Dec 2014

It’s full on fall, and it’s time I’m in Germany once again.

To continue my streak of visiting the country every year, I’m “home” for the 13th consecutive year with the following itinerary over three weeks in November and December (2014):

  • Frankfurt am Main Airport to Köln (Cologne)
  • Köln to Heidelberg
  • Heidelberg to München (Munich)
  • München to Bielefeld
  • Bielefeld to Berlin
  • Berlin to Leipzig
  • Berlin to Frankfurt am Main

I’m very enthusiastic about the train, and my attachment to Deutsche Bahn’s cross-country trains remains. I’ve purchased a 2nd-class rail pass for ten days (within a one month interval) for USD $345, which includes a promotional 25% discount for this year’s 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall.

Bahnhofshalle Fernbahnhof, Flughafen Frankfurt : by Martinroell (Wikipedia)

Long-distance train station, Frankfurt Airport : photo by Martinroell (Wikipedia)

Wartehalle Fernbahnhof, Flughafen Frankfurt am Main : by Heidas (Wikipedia)

Departures hall, long-distance train station, Flughafen Frankfurt am Main Airport : photo by Heidas (Wikipedia)

Am I saving money?

It’s a question everyone asks, and the following comparison will show that the answer is yes.

In the following table, I’ve listed point-to-point fares. I checked fares for the individual “legs” for specific dates on the Deutsche Bahn website, taking note of the lowest and highest 2nd-class fares in both “Sparangebote” (save offers) and “Normalpreis” (normal price) categories. The last farecheck occurred on 23 October (2014). I estimated distances using “Route” (road distances) values returned by the Luftlinie distance calculator (in German). “Hbf” is the abbreviation for “Hauptbahnhof” or “main train station”.

Route, Nov-Dec 2014 Distance Sparangebote Normalpreis
1. Frankfurt(M) Flughafen – Köln Hbf 180 km € 19—45 € 46—67
2. Köln Hbf – Heidelberg Hbf 250 km € 29—55 € 54—82
3. Heidelberg Hbf – München Hbf 340 km € 29—65 € 73—86
4. München Hbf – Bielefeld Hbf
(via Hannover)
740 km € 81—111 € 142
5. Bielefeld Hbf – Berlin Hbf 390 km € 29—49 € 73—84
6. Berlin Hbf – Leipzig Hbf 180 km
€ 19—39
€ 40-47
7. Leipzig Hbf – Berlin Hbf 180 km
€ 19—29
€ 34-47
8. Berlin Hbf – Frankfurt(M) Hbf 540 km € 29—79 € 110—123
9. Frankfurt (M), Hbf – Flughafen 10 km € 4.35 € 4.35
TOTALS
(€1 = USD $1.3)
2810 km
€ 258—476
USD $335—619
€ 576—682
USD $749—887
10-day German Rail Pass
(25% off promotion included)
USD $345 USD $345
Money saved < USD $274 USD $404—542

The Rail Pass does not restrict the passholder to a specific train on a given date and time. To save the most money, purchasing individual Sparpreis fares ahead of time would be the way to go. I could save money by purchasing individual “Sparangebote” fares well in advance. Otherwise, there are generally available “Normalpreis” fares, which are less restrictive but more expensive. The price difference between Sparangebote and Normalpreis fares is much larger with long-distance rail journeys over 250 km; that’s always been the case whenever I’ve visited Germany and I’ve had to cross the country by train.

I want the schedule flexibility, and that’s why I purchase a Rail Pass in advance. If I decide to stay longer or leave early, I can’t change a “fixed” ticket without incurring extra fees. My 10-day Rail Pass allows me the freedom to take a train on any day at any time (up to the maximum of 10 days. My desire for this versatility will save me at least USD $350.

Deutsche Bahn lists the following conditions for their two categories.

Sparangebote: Preis für alle Reisenden. Bei Aktionsangeboten und regionalen Angeboten gelten besondere Konditionen. Zugbindung, d.h. Ihre Fahrkarte ist nur in den auf Ihrer Fahrkarte aufgedruckten Zügen gültig. Umtausch und Erstattung 15 EUR; ab 1. Geltungstag ausgeschlossen.

Normalpreis: Preis für alle Reisenden. Volle Flexibilität (keine Zugbindung/unabhängig von der angegebenen Verbindung auf der gewählten Strecke). Umtausch und Erstattung kostenlos, ab dem 1. Geltungstag 15 EUR.

My rough-and-ready translation is:

Savings offers: price for all travelers. Conditions apply to special and regional offers. Your ticket is valid only as printed for the specified train. 15 EUR charge for exchange or refund before the first valid day; no exchange or refund afterwards.

Normal price: price for all travelers. Full flexibility (no specific train / regardless of specific connection on the chosen route). No charge for exchange and refund before the first valid day; 15 EUR charge afterwards.

Koeln Hauptbahnhof, by Remon Rijper

Photo by Remon Rijper on Flickr

Berlin Hauptbahnhof #XII, Alexander Rentsch

Photo by Alexander Rentsch on Flickr

Previously, on German rail and rail passes

•   German Rail Pass, July-August 2013
•   German Rail Pass, late-2012 RTW
•   Yet another trip with German Rail (2011)
•   Across the country with German Rail
•   Saving money with a German Rail Pass
•   Flexibility with a German Rail Pass

The first two photos are from Wikipedia, and the last two are from Flickr. All photos are used with the generosity of the Creative Commons license. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com, and is part of the Sunday Traveler series.

No Connection, Unpaid, My Own Opinions Disclosure: No Connection, Unpaid, My Own Opinions. I have not received any compensation for writing this content and I have no material connection to the brands, topics and/or products that are mentioned herein (cmp.ly/0).

Germany: back home to visit this fall

… nicht nur Fernweh, sondern auch Heimweh …

In late-fall 2001, I moved sight unseen to the university town of Heidelberg, Germany, equipped with only three phrases in German. When I departed in 2003 to the U.S., I learned some things about myself and about Deutschland; I had also left a big piece of myself behind.

When I’m away for too long, it’s more than possible I’ve a yearning to go somewhere (“Fernweh”), accompanied by the simultaneous longing for home (“Heimweh”). It’s in Germany where I miss friends throughout the relatively compact country, and I miss the little things which are always specific to the big D.

Great Circle Mapper, YVR-FRA

Approximate path for YVR-FRA (Vancouver – Frankfurt), courtesy of Great Circle Mapper

I’ve gone “home” to Germany at least once every year since 2003, and the streak continues for the 11th consecutive year this fall. With flights in and out of Flughafen Frankfurt am Main Airport, I have the following itinerary:

  • 20 November : arrival in Frankfurt
  • 20-24 Nov. : Köln (Cologne)
  • 24-26 Nov. : Heidelberg
  • 26-28 Nov. : München (Munich)
  • 28-30 Nov. : Bielefeld
  • 30 Nov. – 9 Dec. : Berlin, with an excellent chance of Leipzig
  • 10 December : departure from Frankfurt

“Only” 8100 kilometres (5000+ miles) separates Vancouver (YVR) with Frankfurt (FRA). I’m looking forward to catching up with some very good people around the country, as well as the following ten of many things:

  1. Back to K-Ehrenfeld, “mein Kölner Kiez” (my Cologne `hood)
  2. Christmas markets (Weihnachtsmarkt) begin the week of 24 November
  3. Seeing my old “hometown” HD, squeezed on the Neckar between two hills
  4. American Thanksgiving, with some fine people in Bielefeld
  5. At long last in L-Stadt, for Bach, Mendelssohn, & largest train station in Europe
  6. Reopening of C/O Berlin, my mecca of photography in the B
  7. Days in Berlin nowhere enough to do all the things I’ve planned
  8. Number of Bratwurst, Currywurst, Döner, Kartoffelpuffer (Reibekuchen) consumed
  9. Number of Glühwein, Kuchen, Plunder, (Obst)Schnecke, (Quark)Tasche consumed
  10. Moments of anticipation, reflection, & loss on Deutsche Bahn’s InterCityExpress trains

Over these three weeks, I’m on trains crossing the country “yet again”. In between gleeful bouts of stuffing me gullet with food and drink, I’ll describe in the next post how I’m saving money with an advance purchase of a 10-day German Rail Pass.

Flughafen Frankfurt am Main, Terminal 1, Halle A : by Sven Teschke (Wikipedia)

Flughafen Frankfurt am Main Airport, Terminal 1, Halle/check-in area A : by Sven Teschke (Wikipedia)

The latter photo is from Wikipedia, used with the Creative Commons license. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com, and is part of the Sunday Traveler series.

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Berlin

A travel writer once asked me: how would I describe Germany? Start with geography: lush forests, lakes and rivers, jagged Alps to the south, and open seas to the north. But that’s only the surface, where deep underneath there’s rich artistic and cultural heritage; and critical lessons from times of unimaginable ignorance, cruelty, and tragedy.

Her cities also form a large part of the German picture, and I’m very fond of her five largest cities. For every city, I have a selection of G-E-M-S: one Green space (G, Grünanlage); a place to Eat (E, Essen gehen); Museum (M); and something Special (S, Sondertipp). I’ve already written about Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, and Frankfurt am Main. The German capital city of Berlin marks the final part of my series.


Berlin : Germany’s “Hauptstadt”

Brandenburg Gate, Pariser Platz, Berlin

Morning light on Brandenburg Gate (HL, Instagram)

The “Hauptstadt” or capital city is approaching four million people, the largest city in Germany. Berlin is admittedly not exactly one of the world’s pretty or scenic cities, but Berlin is one of the most energetic and self-aware cities in the world. With scores of immigrant experiences, influences, and flavours from around the world, one often hears: “Berlin is not Germany.” It’s both slight and compliment. But they’re also correct, that there’s balance, complexity, and discord for a fitting depiction of the capital region. Berlin isn’t Germany; she’s much more.

“Berlin ist eine Stadt, verdammt dazu, ewig zu werden, niemals zu sein.” (It is Berlin’s destiny never to be, but always to be in the process of becoming.) -Karl Scheffler, “Berlin: Ein Stadtschicksal” (“Berlin: A City’s Fate”), 1910.

Present-day Berlin provides an astonishing variety of things to do, see, sample, eat, and drink. Visitors with a limited amount of time in Berlin will surely begin with sites like the Brandenburg Gate (above). Summarizing Berlin with just a handful of attributes seems almost impossible, but what are some of the other places that can deliver an unexpected, unusual, and thoughtful glimpse into Berlin?


Green space : Tempelhofer Freiheit

Former military runway, Tempelhof Park, Berlin, Germany

Down the runway (HL)

Walking down the former runway, I can almost hear the engines’ roar, feel the vibrations go through my body, as visions of big hunks of wing’ed metal chug down the asphalt surface. Turning my eyes away from the afternoon sun, I’ve returned to the present. Here in the middle of Berlin lies Tempelhofer Freiheit, a park on the land occupied by the former airport.

I’m aware of Tempelhof’s importance to the city’s history (e.g., Berlin Airlift of 1948-49). But it’s a little difficult to think much about history, when my senses tell a different story. I hear the laughter of children, I feel the slight breeze against my skin, I smell meat and vegetables grilling from some distance away. I see bicyclists, joggers, rollerbladers; people walking their dogs, some flying kites; a mini-golf course, an abandoned plane, art displays; and the presence of community gardens. It looks like an ordinary day.

Tempelhofer Freiheit is a big part of many Berliners’ lives, and despite the crunch and pressure to build housing on the site, Berliners have recognized the possible loss of Tempelhof as a green space. On 25 May 2014, the people of Berlin voted to keep the former airfield as green space.

Details: Tempelhofer Freiheit, no admission charge.
Transit stop/station: U-Bahn Tempelhof (U6), U Platz der Luftbrücke (U6), U Paradestrasse (U6), U Südstern (U7), or U Boddinstrasse (U8). Alternatively: S-Bahn Tempelhof (S41, S42, S45, S46).

•   Lead-up and FAQ to the referendum, in German.
•   Complete coverage on Berliner Morgenpost, in German.

Multiple modes of motion, Tempelhof Park, Berlin, Germany

Multiple modes of motion (HL)


Eat : Berliner Currywurst, at the 36 or the 66

Curry 36, Berlin Kreuzberg

Curry 36 : Kreuzberg (HL, Instagram)

It’s one of those things people either love or hate; there’s not much middle ground when it comes to currywurst. Surrendering to my curiosity on a prior visit to Berlin meant I was hooked on the snack that’s loaded with carbs, fat, and awesome sauce. Do I care? No. It’s about grilled sausage swimming in a ketchup sauce mixed with curry powder, crisp fries topped with ketchup-mayo for the familiar “Rot-Weiss” (red-white) appearance.

For some, Berlin is currywurst, and currywurst is Berlin. Some might disagree with anything said about currywurst, while others argue about currywurst’s true origins (Berlin versus Hamburg).

Curry 36 (Kreuzberg) is conveniently located next to Mehringdamm U-Bahn station. The place remains busy with steady lines of hungry people arriving, feeding, and leaving. I’ve found their curry-ketchup recipe a touch on the sweet side, but it’s all good. Over in Friedrichshain, Curry 66’s “scale of spice” will either inspire you to further heights of glory, or plunge you into depths of fear. Regardless of your tolerance to the heat, a good kick of spice is a mighty good way to say “hello” to Berlin’s currywurst.

Curry 36:
Transit stop/station: at street level, next to U-Bahn Mehringdamm (U6).
Curry 66:
Transit stop/station: S-Bahn Warschauer Strasse (S5, S7); U-Bahn Warschauer Strasse (U1), or U Frankfurter Tor (U5).

Curry 66, Berlin Friedrichshain

Curry 66 : Friedrichshain (HL, Instagram)

Museum : Jewish Museum, Berlinische Galerie

Schalechet (Fallen Leaves), Juedisches Museum, Jewish Museum, Berlin, Germany

“Shalechet” (Fallen Leaves) : Jewish Museum (HL)

There are an extraordinary number of museums (170+) and galleries (300+) in the capital region. With a little time on hand, I think these two in close proximity will do very well.

The Jewish Museum Berlin describes the historical importance as well as artistic and economic contributions by the Jewish community to Berlin and to the country. You’ll read about how Berlin became home to the largest Jewish community in the country, the near annihilation of the community in the 1st-half of the 20th-century, and what projects both community and nation are undertaking. One of the most moving and unsettling exhibits is the interactive sculpture called “Shalechet”, or Fallen Leaves.

Located just 500 metres from the Jewish Museum is the Berlinische Galerie (BG), a museum of modern art, photography, and architecture. Their exhibitions provide reminders about how “modern” ideas about expression, design, philosophy, etc. took shape and thrived in the opening decades in the 20th-century. The post-war period not only meant recovery, but also faced treachery, forgiveness, and justice in the art world, as in other facets of German society. The BG is where I saw photographer Nan Goldin’s retrospective, “Berlin Work. Photographs 1984-2009″. Honest, bold, and courageous, she lent a passionate and perceptive eye on the hopes, dreams, demons, and addictions in people’s lives.

Details: Jewish Museum Berlin, and Berlinische Galerie.
Transit stop/station: U-Bahn Hallesches Tor (U6) or U Kochstrasse (U6). Alternatively: S-Bahn Anhalter Bahnhof (S1, S2, S25).

Berlinische Galerie, Berlin, Germany

Letters : Berlinische Galerie (HL)

Special : Spandauer Vorstadt

Hackescher Markt, Spandauer Vorstadt, Berlin, Germany

“Perlen in Berlin” (pearls in Berlin) : Hackescher Markt (HL)

Every time I’m in Berlin, I always find myself back in the Spandauer Vorstadt.

Spandauer Vorstadt was built up outside of (17th-century) city walls and the city-gate known as Spandauer Tor, near today’s Hackescher Markt at the intersection of Oranienburger Strasse and Rosenthaler Strasse. The area is often mislabeled as the Scheunenviertel (“Barn Quarter”), occupying roughly the eastern third of Spandauer Vorstadt (east of Rosenthaler Strasse).

The area was home to the largest Jewish community in the country by the early 20th-century. One visible reminder of the community’s near destruction is the Alter Jüdischer Friedhof (Old Jewish Cemetery), which to an extent is now a hollow memory. However, the reconstructed Neue Synagoge (New Synagogue) on Oranienburger Strasse is an important place for learning and gathering (Centrum Judaicum) for the Jewish community.

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, artists swept into the area, creating small art workshop and exhibition spaces. Some of that early spirit remains with surviving galleries, as well as cafés and bars, going along with the recent injection of money and development. Hackesche Höfe, Sophie-Gips-Höfe, and the Heckmannhöfe are three examples of courtyard complexes with small specialty shops and boutiques. In addition to strolls along Oranienburger Strasse and Rosenthaler Strasse, I recommend the side streets, including Auguststrasse, Grosse Hamburger Strasse, and Sophienstrasse.

Details: Spandauer Vorstadt, in German.
Transit stop/station: U-Bahn Oranienburger Tor (U6), U Alexanderplatz (U2, U5, U8), U Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz (U2), U Rosenthaler Platz (U8), or U Weinmeisterstrasse (U8). Alternatively: S-Bahn Alexanderplatz (S5, S7), S Hackescher Markt (S5, S7), or S Oranienburger Strasse (S1, S2, S25).

Oranienburger Strasse at Friedrichstrasse, Spandauer Vorstadt, Berlin Mitte, Germany

Spandauer Vorstadt at night : Oranienburger Strasse at Friedrichstrasse (HL)

Mapping the G-E-M-S

The map below shows where the G-E-M-S are located:

  • G: Green Space (Grünanlagen) – Tempelhofer Feld;
  • E: place to Eat (Essen gehen) – Curry 36, Curry 66;
  • M: Museum – Jüdisches Museum, Berlinische Galerie;
  • S: Special (Sondertipp) – Spandauer Vorstadt.

With the exception of Curry 66, the G-E-M-S lie along the U6 underground transport line, which I’ve indicated by the thin purple line in the map. From the Hauptbahnhof (Main Train Station, indicated by the train icon in the map), take the S-Bahn (S5, S7, S75) east to Friedrichstrasse station, and transfer to the U-Bahn station of the same name to board U6 trains.

Despite the enormity of choice, I’m more than happy to continue seeking out even more examples for G-E-M-S. It’s no different for anyone who’s also fallen in love with Berlin.

Local transport authority: Verkehrsverbund Berlin-Brandenburg (VBB), also available in English.

With trains to Berlin, a trip lasts about 5 hours from Frankfurt am Main, 2 hours from Hamburg, 4.5 hours from Köln, 6.5 hours from München, 5 hours from Prague, and 5.5 hours from Warsaw.


How much do I love Berlin? A lot …

•   Celebrating Berlin’s (Cölln) 775th anniversary
•   Christmas Eve: a calm city under a blanket of snow
•   ‘The Crier’, from Berlin Germany to Perth Australia
•   Currywurst & conversation, at Curry 61
•   Fall (autumn) colours in the capital city
•   Holocaust Memorial to the Murdered Jews in Europe
•   “Fallen Leaves”, at the Jewish Museum
•   Festival of Lights, the 2012 edition
•   Gleisdreieck station, the summer & winter view
•   Former Jewish Cemetery in Spandauer Vorstadt
•   Quartier 206: an exercise in geometry
•   Berlin Wall, at over 50 years
•   Former East German watchtower, standing in the Mitte
•   Where the Grimm Brothers are buried
•   Wittenbergplatz on a foggy fall night

“Berlin is more a part of the world than just a city.”

Germany’s Urban G-E-M-S

  1. Berlin, 3.5 million
  2. Hamburg, 1.8 million
  3. München (Munich), 1.4 million
  4. Köln (Cologne), 1 million
  5. Frankfurt am Main, 0.7 million

(population source, Deutsche Städtetag)

I made all of the photos above. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com, and also appears as part of the Sunday Traveler series.

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: Hamburg

A quick survey about Germany with friends and colleagues reveals the usual “suspects”: the capital city of Berlin, Munich and Oktoberfest, and the fairy-tale castles in Bavaria.

In my continuing series on Germany’s largest cities, I turn attention to the nation’s 2nd most populous city, Hamburg, to discover some of her G-E-M-S : Green space (Grünanlage), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), Museum, and something Special (Sondertipp).

I’ve recommended G-E-M-S in Frankfurt am Main, Köln (Cologne), München (Munich), and Berlin.


Hamburg: Hanseatic City on the Water

Wandbereiterbruecke, Wandrahmsfleet, Speicherstadt, Hamburg, Germany

Over the Wandrahmsfleet canal in the Speicherstadt (HL)

Even though it isn’t Berlin or Munich, the northern harbour and port city of Hamburg deserves a place in the conversation. Hamburg is a city on and defined by water: the Alster lakes, the Fleete or canals, the Elbe river. These water channels are physical gateway to the Baltic Sea. You’ll also probably cross a bridge or two, and if Venice is known as a city of bridges, Hamburg is also a city of bridges with over 2300.

The name of the city is derived from “Hammaburg” with the early old-Saxon word “Ham” (Hamme) meaning “wetlands” or “marshlands” and “burg” meaning “fort” or “castle”. This dates back to the time of Emperor Charlemagne in the 9th-century AD/CE, but recent archaeological digs have shown the city’s origins pushed to the 8th-century AD/CE.

The city established busy profitable trading routes throughout Europe by land, and by water on the Elbe and by proximity to the Baltic Sea. Hamburg and nearby Lübeck created in the 13th-century a trading alliance which became the powerful naval and commercial Hanseatic League. Hamburg is at present Europe’s 2nd largest port by number of container units moved (after Rotterdam). Hamburg is northern Germany’s powerhouse, both economically and culturally, with the addition of print- and electronic-media companies establishing headquarters in the city.

First impressions are likely to be shared by many, particularly if you’re standing at Jungfernstieg, Rathausplatz, or by Neuer Wall in the middle of the city. Hamburg is beautiful, green, and rich. Whether any one of these characteristics is really independent of the other two is an exercise best left to the visitor’s excursions and inner musings.

And all without referring to meat, cheese, and bread buns.

You’ll go through the canals on foot or by slow boat. You’ll wander through one of many leafy quiet neighbourhoods scattered throughout the city, including the (in)famous Reeperbahn in St. Pauli (and where the Beatles paid their dues). On the Elbe waterfront, you’ll explore the workings of the Port of Hamburg, learn about the history of the Speicherstadt (Warehouse District), and immerse yourselves in the early-morning Fischmarkt (fish market) among the buying and selling of seafood from the North and Baltic Seas.

Hamburg is a beautiful city to explore, and these are four of many reasons why I always come back.


Green space : Alster Lakes

Aussenalster, Alsterufer, Hamburg, Germany

Summer afternoon on the Outer Alster Lake (HL)

A city cannot function properly without green spaces, her “lungs”. While the city looks “out” to the Elbe river for much of her economic activity, the people look “within” to her lakes for fun and relaxation. The two Alster lakes were artificially constructed to dam the Alster river and generate power for water mills in centuries past. The “inner” and “outer” refer to their former locations relative to the city walls which are no longer present. The two lakes are popular for sailing and rowing, and along the banks are an abundance of walking, jogging, and cycling paths, meadows, and parks. A meandering boat tour in the Alster lakes easily convinced me why residents love this stretch of blue and green.

Details: Alster Lakes.
Transit station: S-/U-Bahn Jungfernstieg, S-Bahn Dammtor, or U-Bahn Stephansplatz.


Eat : Edelcurry

Edelcurry, Hamburg, Germany

Currywurst, Hamburg style (HL)

There are “hamburgers” in Hamburg, but if I’m not thinking about smoked herring, I’ve got currywurst in mind. That national snack is a personal obsession, as I discover Hamburg has also claimed currywurst’s origins, although most associate currywurst with Berlin and Herta Heuwer’s invention in 1949. I love the currywurst in Berlin, but I’m obligated to try different versions. Edelcurry is one of many proud and tasty versions in Hamburg. I get a portion of extra-spicy currywurst with crispy fries, washed down with a Bionade or Fritz-Kola. Aaaaaah, but now, I think I’m duty bound to test the varieties of currywurst in the Rhein-Ruhr region …

Details: Edelcurry.
Transit station: S-/U-Bahn Jungfernstieg, S-Bahn Stadthausbrücke, or U-Bahn Gänsemarkt.


Museum : Deichtorhallen

Deichtorhallen, Kunstmeile, Hamburg, Germany

Deichtorhallen on the Kunstmeile or Art Mile (HL)

I admire a great deal of art and photography, and I’ll seek them both out wherever I go. In Hamburg, I’m a regular at the Kunstmeile (Art Mile). The former market halls at Deichtorhallen make up one of the five Kunstmeile institutions, and the Haus der Photographie regularly presents a variety of photography exhibitions, including historical and contemporary collections. One lasting memory is a retrospective of 19th- and 20th-century photography from Paris, including work by Atget, Brassaï, Fukuhara, Hervé, Marville, Kertész.

Details: Deichtorhallen.
Transit station: S-/U-Bahn Hauptbahnhof, or U-Bahn Steinstrasse.


Special : Sternschanze

Juliusstrasse, Lippmannstrasse, Sternschanze, Hamburg, Germany

Juliusstrasse & Lippmannstrasse, Sternschanze (HL)

Yes, the city is loaded with money, but that doesn’t mean I can’t put my feet up with a beer, some easy homestyle food, and watch people going about their errands. I like hanging out in the Sternschanze or the Schanzenviertel, where numerous trendy boutiques, small galleries, cozy cafés, local bars and pubs, and a variety of restaurants will fill an afternoon or two, particularly along Schulterblatt and Schanzenstrasse. For the hip, trendy, alternative, and everybody in between, there’s a welcome atmosphere, even if recent injections of money and redevelopment have raised warnings of gentrification among area residents.

Details: Sternschanze | Schanzenviertel
Transit station: S-/U-Bahn Sternschanze; from this station, I’d also recommend the U3 train for a look around the “city circle”.


Mapping the G-E-M-S

With the location of the city’s Hauptbahnhof (main train station) indicated, the map below marks the G-E-M-S in Hamburg:

  • G: Green Space (Grünanlagen) – Alster Lakes;
  • E: place to Eat (Essen gehen) – Edelcurry;
  • M: Museum – Deichtorhallen, part of Kunstmeile Hamburg;
  • S: Special (Sondertipp) – Sternschanze.

The summer is one of the best times to visit the Hanseatic port city.

Local transport: Hamburg Verkehrsverbund (HVV), available also in English. Depending upon budget and preferred location to stay while you’re in town, do consider these Hamburg train stations: Hauptbahnhof (Main Train Station) indicated in the map above, Dammtor station, Altona station, and Harburg station.

Trains to Hamburg take about 2 hours from Berlin, 4 to 4.5 hours from Frankfurt am Main, 4.5 hours from København (Copenhagen), 4 hours from Köln (Cologne), and 6 hours from München (Munich).


Germany’s urban G-E-M-S

(population source, Deutsche Städtetag)

I made all of the photos above, and this post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

Germany’s urban G-E-M-S: München

Gems: precious stones, sparkly and shiny on sight, cool to touch, and generally very expensive to own. To view these jewels in a museum or gallery, for example, the approach would be done quietly and carefully, behind a variety of security screens.

“Hidden gems” at a given location describe special or unusual activities, sights, or restaurants visitors may not initially be aware. Truth is, “gems” are known to residents, they’re easily accessible, and they’re out in plain sight. As long as you’re paying attention, those “hidden gems” can become something entirely different.

I’ve converted “gems” into acronym G-E-M-S: a Green space (Grünanlange), a place to Eat (Essen gehen), a Museum, and something Special (Sondertipp) to discover. I’ve described urban G-E-M-S in Frankfurt am Main, Köln (Cologne), Hamburg, and Berlin.


München (Munich)

Marienplatz, Munich, Germany

Frauenkirche and Neues Rathaus, Marienplatz (HL)

I once protested:

There’s nothing wrong with the raging keggers and oom-pa-pa at Oktoberfest or the beautiful city that is München. But there’s a lot more to Germany than Oktoberfest. Besides, there’s always the months-long Karneval on the Rhein …

It’s only fair to show some love for München (Munich)!

Munich is the capital city for the state of Bavaria and is Germany’s 3rd largest city with a population of 1.4 million. It’s easy to feel at home, surrounded by the distinctive Bavarian ambience (“bayerische Gemütlichkeit”) that’s relaxed, friendly, and cozy.

You’ll see the ubiquity of the state’s blue-and-white-diamond flag; drink plenty of beer in big glass mugs; eat Brezeln, Sauerbraten, Haxen, Weisswurst; and like some residents, dress up in Lederhosen or Dirndl, even outside Oktoberfest season. You’ll visit Marienplatz to see the Glockenspiel play at the Neues Rathaus, attend Mass in the beautiful churches, examine the produce at the farmers’ market at Viktualienmarkt, shop to your heart’s (and credit cards’) extent at Fünf Höfe or Maximilianstrasse, and yes, you might even drink some more and party hard at Hofbräuhaus.

But when I’m in the “Millionendorf” (village of millions), I’m always looking for something else, something more.


Green space : Englischer Garten

Englischer Garten, English Garden, Muenchen, Munich, Germany

Gentle breeze at the English Garden (HL)

There are many green spaces throughout the Munich area, but the English Garden is a big part of that conversation. With an area reaching over 400 hectares (4 million square metres), there’s more than enough space to find a corner to call your own and spread out for an afternoon. When I’m in town, I’m on a train to Münchner Freiheit for a bite or a coffee, and that fuels my slow meander through the park. If you like people-watching, you’re sure to find surprises and spontaneous moments, from the northern reaches, to the Kleinhesseloher See, down to the river-surfers at Eisbach creek.

Website: English Garden.
Transit stop/station: U-Bahn Odeonsplatz, U Universität, U Giselastrasse, or U Münchner Freiheit.


Eat : Schnitzelwirt im Spatenhof

Schnitzel mit Pommes/Fries, Wiki

Schnitzel example with a wae nibble (Eikus89 on Wiki)

I love schnitzel. I may never find that perfect veal Wiener Schnitzel I once had in Vienna. But discovering this restaurant in central Munich satisfies my Schnitzel cravings. At Schnitzelwirt im Spatenhof, they offer schnitzel made with veal, pork, or turkey; they also have fish and vegetarian versions. Meat that’s pounded thin, lightly breaded, and fried just right is a serious art, and these folks are serious about schnitzel in all its glorious forms.

Website: Schnitzelwirt im Spatenhof.
Transit stop/station: S-/U-Bahn/Tram Karlsplatz (also known as Stachus).


Museum : The Three Pinakotheken

Alte Pinakothek, Muenchen, Munich, Germany

Classic afternoon glow, Alte Pinakothek (HL)

I’ve set foot in Munich dozens of times, and I always come “home” to the Pinakotheken. The Old, New, and Modern Pinakothek contains, respectively, collections of European Art from the 13th- to the 18th-century including Old Masters paintings, European Art from the 18th- and 19th-century, and “modern” and contemporary 20th- and 21st-century art. The Pinakotheken form a part of the large Kunstreal or art district in Munich. Do take note of the different days the three Pinakotheken are closed, but don’t forget that all three are open Sundays with the New and the Modern Pinakothek each charging a special Sunday-admission price of 1 Euro.

Website: Pinakotheken: Old, New, Modern.
Transit stop/station: U-Bahn Theresienstrasse. Alternatively, tram 27 or bus 100 (stop “Pinakotheken”). Bus 100 is known as “Museenlinie”, or Museum line, serving major museums between Hauptbahnhof and Ostbahnhof.


Special : Gärtnerplatzviertel (Isarvorstadt)

Staatstheater, opera house, Gaertnerplatz, Muenchen, Munich, Germany

State Theatre at Gärtnerplatz (HL)

People of all ages come here for the cafés, shops, boutiques by day, and they’re still here for the pubs, bars, and restaurants at night. You’re at the Gärtnerplatzviertel (Gärtner Square Quarter), whose central point is Gärtnerplatz (Gärtner Square) and the Staatstheater (State Theater). There’s just as much activity in neighbouring Glockenbachviertel (Glockenbach Quarter). The Isar is just steps away to the east, if you want to relax by the river’s edge. Rainbow flags fly proudly with the active gay and lesbian scene centred here, too. It’s a great neighbourhood to hang out and chill with friends in a fun, welcoming, and engaging environment.

Website: Gärtnerplatz (in German).
Transit stop/station: S-Bahn Isartor, or U-Bahn Fraunhoferstrasse.


Mapping the G-E-M-S

With the location of the city’s primary train station (Hauptbahnhof) indicated, the map below shows the locations for Munich’s G-E-M-S:

  • G: Green Space (Grünanlagen) – Englischer Garten,
  • E: place to Eat (Essen gehen) – Schnitzelwirt im Spatenhof,
  • M: Museum – The Three Pinakotheken,
  • S: Special (Sondertipp) – Gärtnerplatzviertel, in Isarvorstadt.

Local transport authority: Münchner Verkehrs- und Tarifverbund (MVV), available in English.

Approximate trip durations to Munich by train are 6.5 hours from Berlin, 3.5 hours from Frankfurt am Main, 6 hours from Hamburg, about 4.5 hours from Köln, and just under 2 hours from Salzburg, Austria.

To see how the city provides fantastic examples of hotels, beer, and great food with some glamour, check how Leah spends a glorious 24 hours in the Bavarian capital.


Biergarten

If you’re looking for something like Oktoberfest, the entire summer brings people out to their local “Biergarten” or “beer garden”. There’s always one Biergarten in every city, town, and village, with reasonably priced cold beer and tasty food, with family and group gatherings, as well as neighbourly talk and chatter about the comings and goings about their local or national Fussball-Mannschaft (football side).


Germany’s Urban G-E-M-S

(population source, Deutsche Städtetag)

I made all of the photos, except for the photo of that tasty Schnitzel. This post appears on Fotoeins Fotopress at fotoeins.com.

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